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How to Safeguard the Wellbeing of Children Essay

1.Understand the main legislation, guidelines, policies and procedures for safeguarding children and young people.

1.1Outline current legislation, guidelines and policies and procedures within own UK Home Nation affecting the safeguarding of children and young people.

The Children Act 1989, carried out for the most part on 14 October 1991, introduced comprehensive changes to legislation in England and Wales affecting the welfare of children. The Act: •Reinforces the function of families through definition of parental responsibility •Legislates to protect children who may be suffering or are likely to suffer significant harm •Provides support from local authorities, in particular for families whose children are in need The main aims of the Act are;

•To bring together private and public law in one framework •To encourage greater partnership between statutory authorities and parents •To promote the use of voluntary arrangements •To achieve a better balance between protecting children and enabling parents to challenge state intervention •To restructure the framework of the courts to facilitate management of family proceedings The main principles and provisions embodied in this legislation are that; •The welfare of children must be the paramount consideration when the courts are making decisions about them •Children have the ability to be parties, separate from their parents, in legal proceedings •The concept of parental responsibility has replaced that of parental rights •Delay in deciding questions concerning children is likely to prejudice their welfare

•Certain duties and powers are conferred upon local authorities to provide services for children and families •Local authorities are charged with duties to identify children in need and to safeguard and promote their welfare •A checklist of factors must be considered by the courts before reaching decisions •Orders under this Act should not be made unless it can be shown that this is better for the child than not making the order The Children Act 2004 (Every Child Matters) set out the national framework for delivering children’s services, and identified the Every Child Matters five outcomes for children and young people, which all professionals must work towards. The Government’s aim is for every child, whatever their background or their circumstances, to have the support they need to;

•Stay safe
•Healthy
•Enjoy and achieve
•Economic wellbeing
•Positive contribution

In addition to the Every Child Matters outcomes, The Children Act 2004; •Establishes the duties to ‘co-operate to improve well-being’ and to ‘safeguard and promote welfare’ of children and young people for the statutory agencies •Make local authorities responsible for publishing an integrated Children’s and Young People’s Plan, which describes how they intend to deliver outcomes specified in the Every Child Matters Framework •Gives local authorities the responsibility for setting up a Local Safeguarding Children’s Board (LSCB) •Gives local authorities the responsibility for the arrangements to set up Children’s Trusts, local partnerships between the public, private voluntary and community sectors

Working Together to Safeguard Children 2010 is HM Government guidance that defines Safeguarding, Child Protection and Children in Need. Safeguarding as; •Protecting children from maltreatment, preventing impairment of children’s health or development, ensuring that children are growing up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care and undertaking that role so as to enable those children to have optimum life chances and to enter adulthood successfully. Child Protection as;

•A part of safeguarding and promoting welfare. This refers to the activity that is undertaken to protect specific children who are suffering, or are at risk of suffering significant harm. Effective child protection is essential as part of wider work to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. However, all agencies and individuals should aim proactively to safeguard and promote the welfare of children so that the need for action to protect children from harm is reduced. Children in Need as;

•Those whose vulnerability is such that they are unlikely to reach or maintain a satisfactory level of health or development, or their health or development will be significantly impaired, without the provision of services.

The Protection of Children Act 1999 is to provide protection for children. The key components of the Child Protection Act 1999 are;
•The child’s right to protection is paramount
•Families have primary responsibility for the care and protection of their children
•The child and family have the right to participate in decisions •Parents and children have the right to information

•Accountability is paramount
•Culturally appropriate services need to be provided
•Voluntary intervention is the preferred means of support
•Non-voluntary intervention needs to be limited to the degree necessary to protect the child The Act requires support workers working in the sector to consider and act in the best interests of the child or young person and to report abuse and follow up disclosures of abuse.

The Common Assessment Framework (CAF) is a key part of the Every Child Matters: Change for Children programme. The aim is to identify, at the earliest opportunity additional needs which are not being met by the universal services children are receiving, and provide timely and co-ordinated support to meet those needs. The CAF is voluntary and consent-based. It is underpinned by a partnership approach between families and practitioners, with emphasis on family-based decision-making.

The CAF assesses the strengths and needs of the child and their family, and families play a big part when developing an action plan for meeting any identified additional needs. The CAF is designed to improve joint working and communication, and supports the sharing of information with consent. It is not a referral to other services, but can be used as an evidence base to support referral where appropriate. A CAF should be done when;

•There is parental consent – and young person consent if they are competent
•There are concerns about progress or unmet additional need
•Needs are unclear
•The support of more than one agency is needed

Leeds Safeguarding Children’s Board brings together representatives of each of the main agencies responsible for promoting children’s welfare, and helping to protect children from abuse and neglect. It is responsible for developing, monitoring and reviewing child protection policies, procedures and practice within Leeds, and for providing interagency training for staff across the city who work with children and families. Safeguarding Children and Safer Recruitment in Education was introduced in January 2007 by the Secretary of State and Education and Skills. It is a new vetting and barring scheme for all those working with children and young people.

Regulations have been tightened and new guidance introduced to clarify responsibilities for safer recruitment. It looks at the recruitment and selection processes, recruitment and vetting checks, and duties for safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children in education. The publication also looks at dealing with allegations of abuse against teachers and other staff. The scheme includes;

•Safeguarding children – additional guidance and advice
•Safeguarding children in education
•Recruitment and vetting checks
•Dealing with allegations of abuse against teachers and other staff •Recruitment and selection

The Education Act 2002 was developed to broaden teacher’s responsibilities in relation to child protection. Teachers and other staff in the education service have day-to-day contact with individual children. They are, therefore, particularly well placed to observe outward signs of abuse, changes in behaviour or failure to develop.

1.2 Explain child protection within the wider concept of safeguarding children and young people.

All staff have a responsibility to safeguard children and young people. Today ‘child protection’ is vastly becoming replaced with ‘safeguarding’. It has a much broader range and was produced to provide a framework to protecting children and young people. There are specific recruitment, selection, training and vetting procedures such as CRB (Criminal Records Bureau) checks and disclosures. It also highlights the need to ensure that inappropriate behaviour does not take place and outlines the preferred means by which any allegations or suspicions are reported and acted upon.

Safeguarding a child or young person is also to ensure that they have the opportunity to achieve their true potential and have the right to be protected from abuse. Any organisation that deals with children or young people must have a safeguarding policy in place that it is reviewed and updated regularly. All staff must know the policy and procedures to follow in the event of any cause for concern. It also highlights the importance of shared responsibilities as there can be many different agencies involved in dealing with each case.

1.3 Analyse how national and local guidelines, policies and procedures for safeguarding affect day to day work with children and young people

My school, Pudsey Tyersal Primary School is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of its pupils. We believe all staff and visitors have an important and unique role to play in child protection. My school believes that;

•Schools can contribute to the prevention of abuse
•All children have the right to be protected from harm
•Children need support which matches their individual needs, including those who may have experienced abuse
•Children need to be safe and feel safe in school

Over all aims;
To contribute to the prevention of abusive experiences in the following ways;
•Clarifying standards of behaviour for staff and pupils
•Introducing appropriate work within the curriculum
•Developing staff awareness of the causes of abuse
•Encouraging pupils and parental participation in practice
•Addressing
concerns at the earliest possible stage
To contribute to the protection of our pupils in the following ways;
•Including appropriate work within the curriculum
•Implementing child protection policies and procedures
•Working in partnership with pupils, parents and agencies To contribute to supporting our pupils in the following ways;
•Identifying individual needs where possible
•Designing plans to meet needs

Pudsey Tyersal Primary School will fulfil local and national responsibilities as laid out in the following documents; •Working Together to Safeguard Children 2010 (please see 1.1 for information) •The Children Act 1989 (please also see 1.1 for information) •Leeds Safeguarding Children Board Procedures (2007)(please see 1.1 for information) •Safeguarding Children and Safer Recruitment in Education (DfES 2007) (please see 1.1 for information) •The Education Act 2002 (please see 1.1 for information)

The previous listed guidelines, policies and procedures are conformed to daily by my school. It is my schools job to ensure that these measurements are adhered to. For example, if I was confronted by a child who tells me that he/she is being abused, I must act in accordance to the following guidelines; •Remain calm

•Do not transmit shock, anger or embarrassment
•Reassure the child and tell the child that I am pleased that he/she is speaking to me •Never enter into a pact of secrecy with the child. Assure him/her that I will try to help but let the child know that I will have to tell other people in order to do this. State who this is and why •Tell him/her that I believe them. Children very rarely lie about abuse; but he/she may have tried telling others and not been heard or believed •Reassure the child that it’s not his/her fault

•Encourage the child to talk but do not ask ‘leading questions’ or press for information
•Listen and remember
•Check that I have understood what the child is trying to tell me •Praise the child for telling me. Tell the child that he/she has the right to be safe and protected •Do not tell the child that what he/she has experienced is dirty, naughty or bad •Remember that it is inappropriate to make any comments about the alleged offender •Be aware that the child may retract what he/she has told me. It is essential to record all that I have heard •At the end of the conversation, tell the child again who I am going to tell and why that person or those people need to know

•As soon as I can afterwards, make a detailed record of the conversation using the child’s own language. Include any questions I have asked but don’t add any opinions or interpretations I must not deal with this by myself. I need to inform the designated staff straight away, who, along with the Head teacher will contact Social Services. Children making a disclosure may do so with difficulty, having chosen carefully to whom they will speak. Listening to and supporting a child/young person who has been abused can be traumatic for the adults involved. Support for me will be available from my designated staff or Head Teacher.

1.4 Explain when and why inquiries and serious case reviews are required and how the sharing of the findings informs practice.

Serious case reviews are undertaken when a child or young person dies (including death by suspected suicide) and abuse or neglect is known or suspected to be a factor in the death. Local Safeguarding Children’s Boards (LSCB) may decide to conduct a Serious Case Review whenever a child has been harmed in any of the following situations; •A child sustains a potentially life-threatening injury or serious and permanent impairment of physical and mental health and development through abuse or neglect •A child has been seriously harmed as a result of being subjected to sexual abuse •A parent has been murdered and a domestic homicide review is being initiated under the Domestic Violence Act 2004

•A child has been seriously harmed following a violent assault The purpose behind a Serious Case Review is to learn valuable lessons regarding the case and how well (or not) the local professionals and services worked together to safeguard and promote the welfare of that child or young person. This then helps policies and procedures to be updated and improved to ensure that all agencies are effectively working together to promote child welfare and safeguarding and to act quickly and efficiently to prevent any form of child abuse. In all cases where abuse is suspected or a sustainable allegation is made, teachers and other members of staff should report the information to the designated teacher.

The designated teacher should refer these cases to, or discuss them with the investigating agencies according to the procedures established by the local Area Child Protection Committee and the Local Education Authority. The overall aim of the new provisions is to place the education service’s responsibilities for making child protection arrangements on a legal footing and to provide further safeguards against child abuse.

These will only prove successful if the Government, LEA’s and schools ensure that teachers are aware of their new duties and that they receive training in recognising the signs of child abuse. These new provisions also place a wider duty on schools, further education institutions and LEAs. These bodies now have a duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of children in relation to all functions relating to the conduct of a school.

1.5 Explain how the processes used by own work setting or service comply with legislation that covers data protection, information handling and sharing.

In my placement school Child Protection information is dealt with in a confidential manner. A written record is made of what information has been shared with who and when. Staff will be informed of relevant details only when the designated staff feels their having knowledge of a situation will improve their ability to deal with an individual child and/or family. Child Protection records are stored securely in a central place, separate from academic records. Individual files are kept for each child. The school does not keep family files. Files are kept for at least that period during which the child is attending the school, and beyond that, in line with current data legislation. Access to them by staff other than the designated staff is restricted and a written record is kept of who has access to them and when.

Parents are made aware of what information is held on their children and are kept up to date regarding any concerns or developments by the appropriate members of staff. General communications with parents are in line with home school policies and give due regard to which adults have parental responsibility. In general, my school will discuss concerns with parents/carers before approaching other agencies, and will seek their consent to making a referral to another agency. Appropriate staff will approach parents/carers after consultation with the Designated Staff. However, there may be occasions when school will contact another agency before informing parents/carers, if the school decides that contacting them may increase the risk of significant harm to the child. My school works in partnership with other agencies in the best interests of the children.

Therefore, school will, where necessary, liaise with the school nurse and doctor, and make referrals to Social Care. Referrals should be made, by the Designated Staff, to the Central Local Authority call centre, using the ‘Common Request for Service Form’. Where a child already has a social worker, the referral should indicate the fact and the social worker should also be informed. The school will co-operate with Children and Young People’s Social Care where they are conducting child protection enquiries.

Furthermore, school will endeavour to attend appropriate inter-agency meetings such as Initial and Review Child Protection Conferences, and Planning and Core Group meetings, as well as Family Support Meetings. The school will provide reports as required for these meetings. If school is unable to attend, a written report will be sent. The report will, wherever possible, be shared with parents/carers at least 24 hours before the meeting.

CYP Core 3.3: Understand how to safeguard the well-being of children and young people

1.Understand the main legislation, guidelines, policies and procedures for safeguarding children and young people.

1.1Outline current legislation, guidelines and policies and procedures within own UK Home Nation affecting the safeguarding of children and young people.

The Children Act 1989, carried out for the most part on 14 October 1991, introduced comprehensive changes to legislation in England and Wales affecting the welfare of children. The Act: •Reinforces the function of families through definition of parental responsibility •Legislates to protect children who may be suffering or are likely to suffer significant harm •Provides support from local authorities, in particular for families whose children are in need The main aims of the Act are;

•To bring together private and public law in one framework •To encourage greater partnership between statutory authorities and parents •To promote the use of voluntary arrangements •To achieve a better balance between protecting children and enabling parents to challenge state intervention •To restructure the framework of the courts to facilitate management of family proceedings The main principles and provisions embodied in this legislation are that; •The welfare of children must be the paramount consideration when the courts are making decisions about them •Children have the ability to be parties, separate from their parents, in legal proceedings •The concept of parental responsibility has replaced that of parental rights •Delay in deciding questions concerning children is likely to prejudice their welfare

•Certain duties and powers are conferred upon local authorities to provide services for children and families •Local authorities are charged with duties to identify children in need and to safeguard and promote their welfare •A checklist of factors must be considered by the courts before reaching decisions •Orders under this Act should not be made unless it can be shown that this is better for the child than not making the order The Children Act 2004 (Every Child Matters) set out the national framework for delivering children’s services, and identified the Every Child Matters five outcomes for children and young people, which all professionals must work towards. The Government’s aim is for every child, whatever their background or their circumstances, to have the support they need to;

•Stay safe
•Healthy
•Enjoy and achieve
•Economic wellbeing
•Positive contribution

In addition to the Every Child Matters outcomes, The Children Act 2004; •Establishes the duties to ‘co-operate to improve well-being’ and to ‘safeguard and promote welfare’ of children and young people for the statutory agencies •Make local authorities responsible for publishing an integrated Children’s and Young People’s Plan, which describes how they intend to deliver outcomes specified in the Every Child Matters Framework •Gives local authorities the responsibility for setting up a Local Safeguarding Children’s Board (LSCB) •Gives local authorities the responsibility for the arrangements to set up Children’s Trusts, local partnerships between the public, private voluntary and community sectors

Working Together to Safeguard Children 2010 is HM Government guidance that defines Safeguarding, Child Protection and Children in Need. Safeguarding as; •Protecting children from maltreatment, preventing impairment of children’s health or development, ensuring that children are growing up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care and undertaking that role so as to enable those children to have optimum life chances and to enter adulthood successfully.

Child Protection as;

•A part of safeguarding and promoting welfare. This refers to the activity that is undertaken to protect specific children who are suffering, or are at risk of suffering significant harm. Effective child protection is essential as part of wider work to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. However, all agencies and individuals should aim proactively to safeguard and promote the welfare of children so that the need for action to protect children from harm is reduced. Children in Need as;

•Those whose vulnerability is such that they are unlikely to reach or maintain a satisfactory level of health or development, or their health or development will be significantly impaired, without the provision of services.

The Protection of Children Act 1999 is to provide protection for children. The key components of the Child Protection Act 1999 are;
•The child’s right
to protection is paramount
•Families have primary responsibility for the care and protection of their children
•The child and family have the right to participate in decisions
•Parents and children have the right to information

•Accountability is paramount
•Culturally appropriate services need to be provided
•Voluntary intervention is the preferred means of support •Non-voluntary intervention needs to be limited to the degree necessary to protect the child The Act requires support workers working in the sector to consider and act in the best interests of the child or young person and to report abuse and follow up disclosures of abuse.

The Common Assessment Framework (CAF) is a key part of the Every Child Matters: Change for Children programme. The aim is to identify, at the earliest opportunity additional needs which are not being met by the universal services children are receiving, and provide timely and co-ordinated support to meet those needs. The CAF is voluntary and consent-based. It is underpinned by a partnership approach between families and practitioners, with emphasis on family-based decision-making.

The CAF assesses the strengths and needs of the child and their family, and families play a big part when developing an action plan for meeting any identified additional needs. The CAF is designed to improve joint working and communication, and supports the sharing of information with consent. It is not a referral to other services, but can be used as an evidence base to support referral where appropriate. A CAF should be done when; •There is parental consent – and young person consent if they are competent •There are concerns about progress or unmet additional need •Needs are unclear

•The support of more than one agency is needed

Leeds Safeguarding Children’s Board brings together representatives of each of the main agencies responsible for promoting children’s welfare, and helping to protect children from abuse and neglect. It is responsible for developing, monitoring and reviewing child protection policies, procedures and practice within Leeds, and for providing interagency training for staff across the city who work with children and families. Safeguarding Children and Safer Recruitment in Education was introduced in January 2007 by the Secretary of State and Education and Skills.

It is a new vetting and barring scheme for all those working with children and young people. Regulations have been tightened and new guidance introduced to clarify responsibilities for safer recruitment. It looks at the recruitment and selection processes, recruitment and vetting checks, and duties for safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children in education. The publication also looks at dealing with allegations of abuse against teachers and other staff. The scheme includes; •Safeguarding children – additional guidance and advice •Safeguarding children in education

•Recruitment and vetting checks
•Dealing with allegations of abuse against teachers and other staff
•Recruitment and selection
The Education Act 2002 was developed to broaden teacher’s responsibilities in relation to child protection. Teachers and other staff in the education service have day-to-day contact with individual children. They are, therefore, particularly well placed to observe outward signs of abuse, changes in behaviour or failure to develop.

1.2 Explain child protection within the wider concept of safeguarding children and young people.

All staff have a responsibility to safeguard children and young people. Today ‘child protection’ is vastly becoming replaced with ‘safeguarding’. It has a much broader range and was produced to provide a framework to protecting children and young people. There are specific recruitment, selection, training and vetting procedures such as CRB (Criminal Records Bureau) checks and disclosures. It also highlights the need to ensure that inappropriate behaviour does not take place and outlines the preferred means by which any allegations or suspicions are reported and acted upon.

Safeguarding a child or young person is also to ensure that they have the opportunity to achieve their true potential and have the right to be protected from abuse. Any organisation that deals with children or young people must have a safeguarding policy in place that it is reviewed and updated regularly. All staff must know the policy and procedures to follow in the event of any cause for concern. It also highlights the importance of shared responsibilities as there can be many different agencies involved in dealing with each case.

1.3 Analyse how national and local guidelines, policies and procedures for safeguarding affect day to day work with children and young people

My school, Pudsey Tyersal Primary School is committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of its pupils. We believe all staff and visitors have an important and unique role to play in child protection. My school believes that; •Schools can contribute to the prevention of abuse

•All children have the right to be protected from harm
•Children need support which matches their individual needs, including those who may have experienced abuse
•Children need to be safe and feel safe in school
Over all aims;
To contribute to the prevention of abusive experiences in the following ways;
•Clarifying standards of behaviour for staff and pupils
•Introducing appropriate work within the curriculum
•Developing staff awareness of the causes of abuse
•Encouraging pupils and parental participation in practice •Addressing concerns at the earliest possible stage
To contribute to the protection of our pupils in the following ways;
•Including appropriate work within the curriculum •Implementing child protection policies and procedures •Working in partnership with pupils, parents and agencies To contribute to supporting our pupils in the following ways; •Identifying individual needs where possible •Designing plans to meet needs

Pudsey Tyersal Primary School will fulfil local and national responsibilities as laid out in the following documents; •Working Together to Safeguard Children 2010 (please see 1.1 for information) •The Children Act 1989 (please also see 1.1 for information) •Leeds Safeguarding Children Board Procedures (2007)(please see 1.1 for information) •Safeguarding Children and Safer Recruitment in Education (DfES 2007) (please see 1.1 for information) •The Education Act 2002 (please see 1.1 for information)

The previous listed guidelines, policies and procedures are conformed to daily by my school. It is my schools job to ensure that these measurements are adhered to. For example, if I was confronted by a child who tells me that he/she is being abused, I must act in accordance to the following guidelines; •Remain calm

•Do not transmit shock, anger or embarrassment •Reassure the child and tell the child that I am pleased that he/she is speaking to me •Never enter into a pact of secrecy with the child. Assure him/her that I will try to help but let the child know that I will have to tell other people in order to do this. State who this is and why •Tell him/her that I believe them. Children very rarely lie about abuse; but he/she may have tried telling others and not been heard or believed •Reassure the child that it’s not his/her fault

•Encourage the child to talk but do not ask ‘leading questions’ or press for information •Listen and remember •Check that I have understood what the child is trying to tell me •Praise the child for telling me. Tell the child that he/she has the right to be safe and protected •Do not tell the child that what he/she has experienced is dirty, naughty or bad •Remember that it is inappropriate to make any comments about the alleged offender •Be aware that the child may retract what he/she has told me. It is essential to record all that I have heard •At the end of the conversation, tell the child again who I am going to tell and why that person or those people need to know

•As soon as I can afterwards, make a detailed record of the conversation using the child’s own language. Include any questions I have asked but don’t add any opinions or interpretations I must not deal with this by myself. I need to inform the designated staff straight away, who, along with the Head teacher will contact Social Services. Children making a disclosure may do so with difficulty, having chosen carefully to whom they will speak. Listening to and supporting a child/young person who has been abused can be traumatic for the adults involved. Support for me will be available from my designated staff or Head Teacher.

1.4 Explain when and why inquiries and serious case reviews are required and how the sharing of the findings informs practice.

Serious case reviews are undertaken when a child or young person dies (including death by suspected suicide) and abuse or neglect is known or suspected to be a factor in the death. Local Safeguarding Children’s Boards (LSCB) may decide to conduct a Serious Case Review whenever a child has been harmed in any of the following situations; •A child sustains a potentially life-threatening injury or serious and permanent impairment of physical and mental health and development through abuse or neglect •A child has been seriously harmed as a result of being subjected to sexual abuse •A parent has been murdered and a domestic homicide review is being initiated under the Domestic Violence Act 2004 •A child has been seriously harmed following a violent assault The purpose behind a Serious Case Review is to learn valuable lessons regarding the case and how well (or not) the local professionals and services worked together to safeguard and promote the welfare of that child or young person.

This then helps policies and procedures to be updated and improved to ensure that all agencies are effectively working together to promote child welfare and safeguarding and to act quickly and efficiently to prevent any form of child abuse. In all cases where abuse is suspected or a sustainable allegation is made, teachers and other members of staff should report the information to the designated teacher. The designated teacher should refer these cases to, or discuss them with the investigating agencies according to the procedures established by the local Area Child Protection Committee and the Local Education Authority.

The overall aim of the new provisions is to place the education service’s responsibilities for making child protection arrangements on a legal footing and to provide further safeguards against child abuse. These will only prove successful if the Government, LEA’s and schools ensure that teachers are aware of their new duties and that they receive training in recognising the signs of child abuse. These new provisions also place a wider duty on schools, further education institutions and LEAs. These bodies now have a duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of children in relation to all functions relating to the conduct of a school.

1.5 Explain how the processes used by own work setting or service comply with legislation that covers data protection, information handling and sharing.

In my placement school Child Protection information is dealt with in a confidential manner. A written record is made of what information has been shared with who and when. Staff will be informed of relevant details only when the designated staff feels their having knowledge of a situation will improve their ability to deal with an individual child and/or family. Child Protection records are stored securely in a central place, separate from academic records. Individual files are kept for each child. The school does not keep family files. Files are kept for at least that period during which the child is attending the school, and beyond that, in line with current data legislation. Access to them by staff other than the designated staff is restricted and a written record is kept of who has access to them and when.

Parents are made aware of what information is held on their children and are kept up to date regarding any concerns or developments by the appropriate members of staff. General communications with parents are in line with home school policies and give due regard to which adults have parental responsibility. In general, my school will discuss concerns with parents/carers before approaching other agencies, and will seek their consent to making a referral to another agency. Appropriate staff will approach parents/carers after consultation with the Designated Staff. However, there may be occasions when school will contact another agency before informing parents/carers, if the school decides that contacting them may increase the risk of significant harm to the child.

My school works in partnership with other agencies in the best interests of the children. Therefore, school will, where necessary, liaise with the school nurse and doctor, and make referrals to Social Care. Referrals should be made, by the Designated Staff, to the Central Local Authority call centre, using the ‘Common Request for Service Form’. Where a child already has a social worker, the referral should indicate the fact and the social worker should also be informed.

The school will co-operate with Children and Young People’s Social Care where they are conducting child protection enquiries. Furthermore, school will endeavour to attend appropriate inter-agency meetings such as Initial and Review Child Protection Conferences, and Planning and Core Group meetings, as well as Family Support Meetings. The school will provide reports as required for these meetings. If school is unable to attend, a written report will be sent. The report will, wherever possible, be shared with parents/carers at least 24 hours before the meeting.


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