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Historian Essay Topics & Paper Examples

City Life During The Mid 1800s

Source Two: Taken from the internet site ‘Victorian Web’; 2002 During the first decades of Victoria’s reign, baths were virtually unknown in the poorer districts and uncommon anywhere. Most households of all economic classes still used “privy-pails”; water closets (flush toilets) were rare. Sewers had flat bottoms, and because drains were made out of stone, seepage was considerable. If, as was often the case in towns, streets were unpaved, they might remain ankle-deep in mud for weeks. Source Three: 1850s cartoon; ‘A Court for King Cholera’ (From Punch Magazine) Source Four: Henry Mayhew, ‘Jouneys through London’; 1849 W e then journeyed on to London Street, down which the tidal ditch continues its course. In No. 1 of this street the…

Remembering the Alamo

This article is of course about the Alamo. It gives a very brief history of the battle at the Alamo and the characters that participated there. It momentarily mentions that there are now facts and history of the Alamo being disputed among many historians today. This article also makes comments concerning the great influence The Alamo has had in today’s culture, referring to the many productions based off this historic happening. Each time I remember the Alamo inspiration fills my chest. I love to remember the great heroes that fought so brave and valiantly in the face of the opposition; a cruel dictator (Santa Anna) and the oppression he could inflict. Many of the people that inhabited 2nd Chance Texas…

The Stone Age

The Stone Age was the millennium of the modern world. The Neolithic and the Paleolithic eras consists of many comparisons within entities regarding the usage of stone tools, the development of art paintings, and the differences in physical geography that has shaped the world today. The usage of stone tools began two million years ago with stone chipping. With stone chipping the early humans, or also known as Homo sapiens wanted to find a way to persist. The Homo sapiens discovered that by chipping the edge of a large stone or a large pebble made a sharp edge. These chipped stone tools were often use for defense, hunting animals, or cutting. Also other tools were made out of bone, ivory,…

Annotated Timeline: 1763-1783

1763: The Proclamation of 1763 was a royal directive issued after the end of the French and Indian War that prohibited settlement, surveys, and land grants west of the Appalachian Mountains. It was an attempt to organize western lands gained as a result of the 1763 Treaty of Paris and it appease Native American tribes who lived in the areas. British North American colonists resented being denied access to lands they felt they had fought for and won in the French and Indian War. 1764-Sugar Act: A law passed by British Parliament which raised taxes on foreign refined sugar, leading to a monopoly in the West Indies that was controlled by British sugar farmers. 1765-Stamp Act: An act proposed by…

Killing Custer Book Review

From time to time, a book of true historical significance is written on a subject that has been written on almost endlessly. The Battle of the Little Big Horn is one of the most written about, speculated on, celebrated, talked about, and glorified events in American History. Popularly known as “Custer’s Last Stand”, it has been the subject of many films, documentaries, novels, and was even re-enacted at every Wild West Show put on by Buffalo Bill Cody. In the work Killing Custer: The Battle of Little Bighorn and the Fate of the Plains Indians, Welch and Stekler do an excellent job in the subject matter at hand, and come to the correct conclusion that this battle, which was a…

What Was Revolutionary About the Military Revolution

The historical paradigm of the military revolution found its first main proponent in Michael Roberts’s The Military Revolution, 1560-1660. The theory of the ‘military revolution’ is the period of years from the mid fifteenth century to the end of the eighteenth century saw a radical modernisation of the science of warfare. The advancement of gunpowder artillery technology was the catalyst for the fundamental transformation of warfare in the Early Modern period. The innovation in artillery saw a renewal of reconstruction in the military and civic fortifications of the period to enable medieval defences of the Early Modern World to be able to withstand a sustained bombardment from the new advanced artillery. The innovation in gunpowder firepower realised a far-reaching change…

History of Pueblo Revolt

“Every piece of written history starts when somebody becomes curious and asks questions.”[1] In Weber’s compilation he gathers several of these curious peoples works and binds their writings together to form a sort of continued discussion. Arguing from different sources and coming from different backgrounds, they indubitably arrive at different conclusions. From Garner to Gutiérrez and from Chávez to Knaut, they all are part of a continued dialogue on what that caused the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. By addressing the readings as a sum instead of individual accounts, one can gain a more detailed view. While some poke holes in others theories, most of the time, the writers simply offer different perspectives. The vast range of the arguments speak to…

Four Eras of Writing

History has evolved over the last two centuries. In the introduction to Interpretations of American History edited by Francis G. Couvares, et al., he states that the transition of the way history was interpreted has only “linked the past more strongly to the present” (Couvares 1). Before, historians –mostly white male- used to report only about “male” topics but since then, different issues have transformed the way history used to be. Over the last 400 years, the four different stages that have reshaped the writing of American history have been the providential, the rationalist, the nationalist, and the professional. Late- nineteenth-century historians, usually called “historicists” or “positivists” believed that history was like science and with practice it could be solved….

History 201: World History 1400-1900

This course is concerned with the history of Modern Europe from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the present. However, it will not be a survey of all the “important” events and personalities of the period. The central theme will be revolution. This term refers to momentous events such as the French Revolution, the Russian Revolution and World War I. We are also interested in revolutionary changes in thought such as occurred during the Enlightenment and earth shaking social and/or economic developments including the Industrial Revolution and the Pursuit of Empire. Reading List: Available at the Bookstore M. Perry et al, Western Civilization: Ideas, Politics and Society from the 1400s, Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009 From…

Alexander the Great’s Military Accomplishments

There is only one other man who is written about in at the level of Jesus Christ, his name was Alexander the Great. Alexander the Great is one of the most told about, and written about Kings of the ancient world. Not only was he a vastly loved and appreciated leader to his army but he was a conqueror of much of his known world. His military genius and tactics, even at his young age of attaining the throne from his father Philip II after he was assassinated, were unrivaled resulting in him never to lose a battle. Alexander the Great had no easy time upon his ascent to the throne, the authors said “He had to put down the…

History according to the Male Historian

Gender plays a very important role in the definition of history. Male historians are often presented as scientific thinkers. But the truth is that they merely perpetuate religious, ethnocentric or class-based versions of the past under the guise of neutrality. Female historians, on the other hand, are usually dismissed as propagators of amateur or irrelevant historical accounts. This observation most likely stemmed from their preference to study domains such as the lives of queens and other accomplished women, as well as manners, mores and everyday life. The accounts of Marco Polo and Ibn Khaldun are two evidences of history’s male-oriented nature. Their versions hail men and or patriarchal values as the agents of change in a given society. Such a…

Miniver Cheevy Analysis

Miniver Cheevy by Edwin Arlington Robinson is a dramatic lyric poem that acts as self-portrait satire as Robinson ridicules his own life and dreams of a living in a time period where his failures could be seen as triumphs. Through his character Miniver Cheevy, Robinson criticizes not only himself, but 19th and 20th century America using diction. Robinson gave himself away with the first line: “Miniver Cheevy, child of scorn.” Robinson’s parents were expecting a girl when he was born and did not name him for six months. His name was picked out of a hat by a stranger on while his family was on vacation. Needless to say, he did not feel wanted growing up. “He wept that he…

The Great Patriotic War, Cold War, WWII Alliances

The Great Patriotic War: The great Patriotic War is a term used in Russia or previous parts of the Soviet Union when referring to a part of the Second World War. It had originally been used first under the French invasion led by Napoleon and when referring to the First World War, before it again was used. The name represented fighting for your homeland. The Great Patriotic War (GPW) were during the German Occupation of the USSR, which lasted from 22nd of June1941, until 9th of May 1945. The Soviet term only refers to the war between USSR and Nazi Germany and it’s European allies on the east front were Germany had approximately 200 divisions. It does not refer to…

Victorian Period – a Time of Change (1837 -1901)

“All art is at once surface and symbol. Those who go beneath the surface do so at their own peril. Those who read the symbol do so at their own peril.”–by Oscar Wilde, Preface, “The Picture of Dorian Gray” The Victorian Period revolves around the political career of Queen Victoria. She was crowned in 1837 and died in 1901 (which put a definite end to her political career). A great deal of change took place during this period–brought about because of the Industrial Revolution; so it’s not surprising that the literature of the period is often concerned with social reform. “The common perception of the period is the Victorians are “prudish, hypocritical, stuffy, [and] narrow-minded” (Murfin 496). As Thomas Carlyle…

The Transformation of the Trans-Mississippi West, 1860-1900

I. Native Americans and the Trans-Mississippi West a. The Plains Indians i. Three major sub regions: -The northern Plains: Lakota, Flatheads, Blackfeet, Assiniboins, northern Cheyennes, Arapahos, and Crows -The Central region: Five Civilized Tribes, agricultural life, before horses -South: western Kansas, Colorado, eastern New Mexico, and Texas: the Comanches, Kiowas, southern Arapahos, and Kiowa Apaches -Extended family ties and tribal cooperation; families joined clans to help make decisions -Sioux bands focused on religious and harvest celebrations and was complex; life was a series of circles; self torture; sacrificing; -Indians dispersed across the landscape to minimize damage to the lands; b. The Destruction of Nomadic Indian Life -declining bison, intruding miners, the Federal Gov’t introduced tribal reservations -expected to change to…

Rhodes Personal Statement

Soaked in sweat, I sat deep in thought on the small mound of sand and broken rocks in northern Kenya, where 1.7 million years ago a desperately ill Homo erectus woman had died. Her death had entranced me for years. KNM-ER 1808 had died of Hypervitaminosis A, wherein an overdose of Vitamin A causes extensive hemorrhaging throughout the skeleton and excruciating pain. Yet a thick rind of diseased bone all over her skeleton—ossified blood clots—tells that 1808 lived for weeks, even months, immobilized by pain and in the middle of the African bush. As noted in The Wisdom of the Bones, by Walker and Shipman, that means that someone had cared for her, brought her water, food, and kept away…

Education in the 19th Century

I. General Theme: * Nationalism in Europe grew stronger and with it was the belief in the power of education to shape the future of nation as well as individuals. * Spread of democratic ideas and of the application industry to science. * There were charity schools supported by the church and charitable organization. * Establishment of agricultural, commercial, scientific and industrial schools II. Specific Events and Facts 1. Increase in the number of Science Schools “The Nineteenth Century,” says Lavasseur, “is the first which has systematized and generalized the education of the people for the value of education in itself.” The Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University was established in 1847, the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard in 1848,…

The Modern Era

Early Modern World Historians sometimes refer to the era between the premodern (or medieval) and late modern eras as the “early modern world.” The world during this era was increasingly united by the projection of European power abroad, especially in the Americas. Although early modern Europeans still had little knowledge of, let alone hegemony (influence) over, the inland regions of Africa and Asia, the links created and dominated by Europeans made the entire world a stage for fundamental historical processes. Historians debate, or pass over in silence, the problem of determining the precise starting and ending dates of the early modern world and have produced only the vaguest consensus. Roughly, the era of the early modern world began during the…

The Gifts of Investigation

Throughout history there have been various rumors that King Richard III murdered his two nephews known as the princes of the tower. When Detective Alan Grant received a portrait of Richard Plantagenet, his desire to solve the mystery was peaked. As Grant investigates the allegations against Plantagenet, an abundance of information was recovered. Alan Grant’s ability to make wise selections, view a variety of perspectives, and thoroughly analyze the information allowed him to solve the mystery. Alan Grant discovers and receives a plethora of information during his investigation. He begins his investigation by requesting information from everyone that he came in contact with about the princes of the tower and King Richard III. Grant was informed several times that the…

“The Black Tulip” by Alexandre Dumas

The book tells about a young man with a lot of money who grows flowers in his spare time, and tries to grow a black tulip. His name is Cornelius Van Baerle. He wants to grow the black tulip because there is a big prize offered for the first man who can grow a black tulip. The prize is 100,000 dutch money. Cornelius’s neighbor, whose name is Isaac Boxtel, is also a tulip grower and he is jealous and is afraid that Cornelius will succeed to grow the black tulip before him and will get the prize before him, so he goes to the government’s office and tells that Cornelius spoke and collaborated with government criminal, calls Cornelius De Witt,…

The Illuminati speech

The Illuminati. 237 years of captivating conspiracies. Many of you may know the popular image of the all seeing eye sitting atop a pyramid, however what does it all mean? The illuminati was discovered in 1776, by Adam Weishaupt, who was a professor of Canon Law and Practical philosophy. It is thought that it was around before the Garden of Eden was invented, however that is just a conspiracy. Its definition is: people claiming to possess special enlightenment or knowledge of something. The unknown is what has me so interested in the illuminati, and opens my eyes to a bigger picture of our world today. Some of the views of the illuminati include: There is a supreme deity; however the…

Cultural Change and Shifting Views of America

The Chicago World’s Fair in 1893 was a huge event! Not only because the World’s fair is a big deal, but this particular World’s fair was a hard one for Chicago to get. Many other big cities put in their bids to host the event, including New York and Washington D.C. On May 1, 1893, the gates opened at the World’s Columbian Exposition. This fair which was meant to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ first voyage also served as a showcase for a fully rebuilt Chicago. ”At the core of the fair was an area that quickly became known as the White City for its buildings with white stucco siding and its streets illuminated by electric lights” (Maranzani,…

The Middle Ages

The Middle Ages was an era that could be described several different ways. Like all spans of time they had their downfalls, victories, different views of faith, and different forms of government. The Middle Ages span from 500 to 1500 in Europe. This is a very extensive period of time, and it is difficult to label it with one name. So many different events and themes took place. Nevertheless, the labels that best describe this era would have to be The Dark Ages, The Age of Feudalism, and The Age of Faith. The Middle Ages could be referred to as the Dark Ages for several reasons. In this time period there were a lot of wars and raids taking place,…

DBQ Middle Ages

The Middle ages began after the fall of the Roman Empire. It can be defined as a time of minimal cultural and scientific achievements, suffering, feudalism, and power of the church. The labels for the Middle Ages that best describe the era between 500 and 1400 in Europe are the Dark Ages, the Age of Feudalism, and the Age of Faith. The Middle Ages should be labeled the Dark Ages because of the years of suffering that was inflicted from invasions. Invaders, usually from the North, would come into towns and completely lay waste to everything. These invasions made people live in fear and abandon their homes in refuge of safer places. In document one, “They sacked town and village…

Roman Empire Between 100 CE and 600 CE

Between the years 100 CE and 600 CE the Romans were experiencing plenty of changes within the empire. They experienced the overall collapse of their empire, and Christianity gained a foothold in their culture. In addition to these changes however, the empire experienced many continuities of Roman traditions thanks to the Byzantine Empire that came after its decline. The most substantial change that the empire underwent in the late classical era was its decline and eventual collapse. Around 100 CE, the empire was experiencing a period of peace and prosperity or in other words, their golden age. The territory seemed to be always expanding, trade was thriving, artistic creativity was at its peak, and the economy was booming. A short…

The Rise and Fall of the Ottoman Safavid and Mughal Empires

The Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal Empires were forces to be reckoned with back in the day. Being powerful entities, their rise was paved with military prowess, religious tolerance, and having meritocratic systems, though this is not always the case. Their fall, however, was the result of their treatment of peasants, a plague of horrid rulers, and shortsighted economic handling. The Ottomans were blessed for forty-six years with one of the greatest rulers of the thirteenth century – Suleiman the Magnificent. Suleiman brought the Ottoman Empire into a Golden Age, where architecture, literature, art, theology, and philosophy flourished. Being one of the few empires in the 1500’s to have a meritocratic system, everyone in Suleiman’s court was prudently and cautiously chosen…

Why Did William Win The Battle of Hastings?

William won the Battle of Hastings in 1066. He won because of his planning and leadership as well luck and having a big and strong army. Planning helped William a lot because he knew that if he made Harold Godwinson and his Saxon army travelled from the north of England to the south of England, where the Normans had set their camp up, then the Saxons would be very tired whilst the Normans would be rested. He also knew that once the bad winds had stopped, his army could cross safely without the Saxons to stop them for they were in the north of England fighting Harold Hadrada. This was also to do with luck. Whilst the battle was going…

Why Did William Win The Battle Of Hastings?

The Battle of Hastings was fought on the 14th October 1066 (shortly after King Edward the confessor had died) between Harold Godwinson and William of Normandy. The battle was fought on Senlac hill 10 kilometres away from Hastings. The battle started because when King Edward died, he left no heir to the throne. The men who claimed to be king were Harald Hadrada, Harold Godwinson and William of Normandy. This essay will decide why William won the battle of Hastings by looking at the tree following factors: William’s skill, Harold’s poor leadership and Harold’s bad luck. The first argument as to why William won the battle of Hastings, is that he had the bet army. The Normans had 7500 men,…

“Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper,” by Paul E. Johnson

“Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper,” by Paul E. Johnson shows the many different attitudes toward Sam Patch. It displays certain attitudes toward Sam Patch and his jumps. Some people are amazed by his jumps and think the world of him; others poke fun at him and use every mishap by Sam to derail him from his practices. Sam Patch didn’t seem to pay much attention to these hateful comments. Sam Patch became a celebrity in America through his many successful jumps. In the beginning, however, his attitude was different as well as the meanings behind each jump than from his later jumps. Sam Patch’s first major jumps in Paterson at Passaic Falls got the town talking and his name in…

Of Plymouth Plantation

“Of Plymouth Plantation” is a manuscript of Bradford’s history starting in 1620. The first book was copied into the church records and preserved, but unfortunately the second part was presumably lost. The manuscripts were found in the residence of the Bishop of London and were published together for the first time in 1856. There seems to be immeasurable history in these books. William Bradford, the author of “Of Plymouth Plantation” gives a narrative of the voyage to Cape Cod. In the beginning of chapter 9, Bradford starts with a story of a young sailor whom had cursed and slighted the pilgrims for their weakness and constant sickness. However, that same sailor died from an unstated disease, giving the pilgrims peace…