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Greece Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Greek Unity

There is much discussion over whether it was Greek unity that caused the victory against the Persians in the years 490BC-479BC. The three main points of view on the matter is that they were not united at all, which can be seen from the accounts of Herodotus, that they were united, which can be seen in the Themistocles Decree and that it was Themistocles himself that made them unified. It is on the research of Herodotus that we rely most heavily on for our information of the Persian War period. He is often criticised for his inaccuracy, bias and failure to evaluate events properly. Unfortunately there is no other major ancient source against which scholars can check his facts. Plutarch…

Olympia Sanctuary

The sanctuary of Olympia lies in the alluvial valley formed by the confluence of the rivers Kladeos and Adelpheos, bounded to the north by the wooded hill of Kronos. The sanctuary of Zeus is located in the northwest part of the Peloponnese. Olympia can be identified as a non-urban sanctuary, and consequently, as a Panhellenic sanctuary. The use of the term Panhellenic, in present purposes, indicates a major shrine in a Greek territory that is not dominated by a major polis or ethos. Zeus’ sanctuary was under the government of Elis, and, in the early period, Elis was considered a weak government. In the Greek world, all communities were religious, and, worshipping the gods, as well as taking part in…

Aristogoras of Miletus

In 499 BCE, Aristagoras made a mistake that greatly changed history and led to western ideas being spread throughout the world, a major turning point in shaping the culture of future generations. It resulted in many wars and conquests but ultimately this mistake is why today delegates to the United Nations wear suits and ties instead of turbans. Aristagoras was the Persian governor of Miletus on the edge of the Persian Empire. The nearby island of Naxos rebelled against the Persian Empire and Aristagoras seized the opportunity to take it back and get a promotion to a better position from the Persian emperor Darius I. At the very least, even if it did not lead to advancement, he could add…

Athens vs Sparta

Athens which is in southern Europe is one of the oldest cities in Ancient Greece. It is believed to have been established in the end of the fourth millennium BC. The name Athens is derived from ancient Greek goddess Athena. Sparta is said to have been founded by Lacedaemon the son of Zeus and Taygete who married Sparta the daughter of Eurotas. Sparta was a city that was on the banks of the River Eurotas in ancient Greece. In the next few paragraph I will compare and contrast a few things between Athens and Sparta. First will be the Government of the two, next will be the religion among both and last will be the lives of the citizens of…

Birds of a Feather

“If birds of a feather flock together, they don’t learn enough” ~Robert Half~ The first thing that comes to mind when reading this quote is a flock of geese. They all stick together. They learn from one another and what they learn they pass on to future generations. While this is how they learn to stay safe, they are “stuck” doing the same thing every day. After reading the quote a few more times and looking at it from “outside the box” I realized that the birds represent people. Throughout our lives we see examples of this same behavior. For example, in high school there are many “flocks” who all dress, talk, and express themselves similarly. Why? Because it makes…

A cultural analysis of Greece

This paper presents a cultural analysis of Greece and how this translates into the country’s business practices. The importance in such profiling can be seen in the emergence of many cross-cultural studies that aim to come up with an effective theoretical framework that guides international companies to relate to other companies from different countries with different cultures. One of these frameworks was formulated by a series of national studies conducted by Hofstede in which the author identified cultures according to five indices. Basically, Hofstede’s approach presents that culture can be described as a set of characteristics ingrained or “wired-in” to the brains and the psyche of the members of a particular society thereby affecting behavior. With such understanding according to…

On Making Peace with Cruel Absurdity

Cristina Peri Rossi’s (2008) State of Exile is one of those books that the reader would like to learn the Spanish language for. A moving book of poetry originally written in Spanish, State of Exile compels the reader to relate to the poet as a fellow human being. Rossi writes, “I have a pain here,/ On my homeland side. ” Hence, the reader would like to take the poet home. As this is impossible, however, the reader is forced to dwell on the following puzzling question with the poet: Why are human beings cruel to each other? The poet describes exile thus: “The is no return:/ time flies/ space changes/ everything spins in infinite circle/ of cruel absurdity” (Rossi). But,…

The golden proportion

Among many proportions there is one having unique properties. If the ratio of the sum of the quantities to the larger quantity is equal to the ratio of the larger quantity to the smaller one, then the two quantities are in golden proportion, denoted by the Greek letter phi (? ). And this proportion can be called in different terms such as the golden mean, golden section or the golden proportion which is an irrational mathematical constant having a value of approximately equal to 1. 6180339887… As a definition, the golden rectangle can be described as a rectangle which has a height to base proportion of 1: 1. 6180339 (approximately). This special rectangle is found in many places. It is…

Ancient Greeks

Ancient Greeks made many influential contributions to western civilization such as in the areas of philosophy, art and architecture, and math and science. The Greeks were a remarkable civilization and contributed things people use in every day life then, and currently. Some very important people of Ancient Greece include Socrates, Aristotle, Pericles’, Hippocrates, Euclid, Sophocles, Plato and Galen. All of these people shaped western civilizations, while Greece was in two wars at the time. They pushed through hardships and still created innovations that contributed to the western civilization. In the area of Philosophy, Socrates, Aristotle and Plato had a belief system that was very powerful. The philosophers initiated an approached that was based on reason. Their theories were diverse and…

The Fates of Greek Mythology

If “The Fates” predate the Greek Gods and seemingly have control over their destinies in addition to those of humankind, then why are they not glorified figures in Greek mythology? Greek mythology is centered upon the various Gods and their contributions to every aspect of human life. The people of Ancient Greece worshipped Zeus and his contemporaries and exalted them in several mythological works. In the eyes of the people, the Gods controlled every sector of Greek society. The Moirai, or “Fates”, however, who existed even before the Gods made their mark on the Greek world, determined the fate of humans and deities alike. This consequently raises the question of why the Fates were not portrayed as glorified figures in…

How it Relates to Greek Religion and Culture

Ancient Greeks believed in a series of myths, which explained nature, set the moral code for the Greek people, and some were just entertaining stories. These myths turned the Greek world from a world of fear into a world of wondrous beauty. Many of these gods and goddesses were associated with a particular task or activity (Buxton). The Greek people believed that the gods were incorporated into every aspect of their lives. The Ancient Greeks, being a polytheistic culture, created many extravagant myths regarding 12 gods and goddesses that they believed to rule all aspects of their lives. These myths were an early science. They were the result of the Greeks trying to explain the world around them. The Greek…

How My Big Fat Greek Wedding

Introduction My Big Fat Greek Wedding is an ethnographic style film that can be viewed in relationship to the anthropological concepts of endogamy and family acceptance of marriage to non-Greek partners. Anthropological views of this film will be addressed in this paper to assess familial relationships in the Greek culture. The film My Big Fat Greek Wedding is a great example of truths and misconceptions of the Greek culture. Summary of My Big Fat Greek Wedding The film titled My Big Fat Greek Wedding is a Hollywood-style anthropological film. This romantic comedy tells the story of a Greek family who emigrated from Greece to North America and who have three children, one being a daughter who is a bit plain…

A History of Greece

Western Civilization owes much of its development to Greek history because most of the current principles and knowledge of man was derived from this ancient culture. The foundations of mathematics, science, medicine, philosophy, politics and even the different forms of art nowadays were first established long before Christ was born in these Mediterranean islands. The Bronze Age (3000 BCE to 1100 BCE) Bronze became a heavily used metal in Greece during 3000 B. C. It was used to make different tools and ancient battle weapons that were all part of Greek daily life. The three great civilizations that are worth studying were born on different parts of Greece. The Minoans settled on Crete at around 2600 B. C. This community…

Sport and Society in Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece is one of the most ancient civilizations in history and some historians say it is one of the greatest. They have survived many invasions and attacks from barbarians and Persians as well. The Greeks those times were divided into city states and they don’t have any form of alliance with each other. They don’t help each other on wars they except for times that they don’t have a choice. The Greek society is basically unique. Greece had never been united under one sole ruler. And even the city states are fought among each other on whom or which city-state should rule Greece. These qualities of the Greece made the Greek history interesting. Mark Golden’s book, Sport and Society…

The classical Athens and Han china differences

Han china and classical Athens shared many differences around the 5th century such as cultural image, cultural environment, social structures, and the overall similarities and differences. Document B (population estimates from mixed sources…) states that the population of classical Athens in 422 B.C.E was to be 315,000 total. Whereas Doc C (population estimates from mixed sources) the population of Han china in 200 C.E was 65,000,000 total. Han china and classical Athens population was distributed differently. Like classical Athens population distribution was more general so it was divided in four sections which were free male citizen, free male non- citizens, free females and slaves. However Han china population distribution was more specific so it was divided into six sections which…

The Myth of Hades: Relevance Today

Today Greek mythology tells the story of a dark underworld called Hades, named after its formidable ruler, Hades, the god of death and the dead (Atsma, 2008). According to the surrounding mythology, souls entering Hades had to cross each of five subterranean rivers which flowed through the underworld before facing judgment and being sent to their final resting place. Although the myth of Hades is centuries old, various cultures continue to believe in its premises: the existence of an underworld ruled by an underworld lord. Belief in an UnderworldMany religions today have their own version of Hades, and according to a 2004 Gallup Poll, 70% of Americans believe in hell (Religion Facts, 2004). The New Testament of the Bible speaks…

Medea shows that seeking revenge undermines any hope of justice

The brutal course of revenge which Medea exacts on Jason may suggest that in the pursuit of revenge, one render any prospect of attaining justice to be void. However in an indirect way, Medea’s course of revenge which implicates the lives of innocents, exerts a punishment on her. Ultimately, the fact that Medea is not directly subjected to a punishment for her extreme course of her revenge is attributable to her ancestry – she is the grand-daughter of the Sun-God. This nullifies any suggestion that seeking revenge overthrows the likelihood of justice, as Medea’s divine circumstances are an anomaly. Thereby, this outcome of her ploy of revenge is not representative of the outcome which an identical course of revenge would…

“The Odyssey” – Telemachus’ Journey

When does a boy become a man? This rite of passage is explored in Robert Fagles’ translation of Homer’s epic poem, The Odyssey. Odysseus (king of Ithaca) fought in the Trojan War for ten years and after the fall of Troy he spent the next ten years trying to get home. He left behind an infant son, Telemachus, and a devoted wife, Penelope. Although they longed for Odysseus’ return, Penelope and Telemachus were the perfect hosts to wayward strangers – even as their estate became overrun with arrogant suitors – men intent on marrying Penelope and taking possession of the throne. Athena, goddess and daughter of Zeus, is instrumental in encouraging Telemachus to begin his journey to adulthood saying, “You…

“King Midas” and “Daedalus and Icarus” Comparison Essay

King Midas and Daedalus and Icarus Comparison EssayKing Midas and Daedalus and Icarus are two Greek myths. In King Midas the king receives a wish from Dionysus after doing him a favour. Midas chooses that everything he touches turns to gold. Daedalus and Icarus focuses on the main characters escape from King Minos captivity. Daedalus invents wings to escape, but his son does not follow his advice and flies too high. This causes the sun to melt the wax holding his wings together and Icarus plummets towards his death. Both myths show some of the morals and philosophies of the Ancient Greeks. King Midas and Daedalus and Icurus convey Greek morals, such as hubris and the golden mean through their…

An Interpretation of Horace’s Art of Poetry

The epistle from Horace’s Art of Poetry was not merely a guide for good literature, but it was a sophisticated writing that displayed his principles and wisdom, and the contemporary Hellenistic influence on the Romans. Horace’s profound work clearly asserted his position as a literary master. Throughout his letter to Piso, he was able to make his description interesting and explanation convincing. He exhibited his expertise in literature by presenting detailed guidelines to write proficiently. Among his suggestions, he stressed precision, good iambic lines, and proper literary styles and formats. He also emphasized on the importance to strive for unity, as the writing would lose strength without coherence. If he were not a master at literature, he would not be…

Nature of Athenian Imperialism

After the conclusion of the Persian Wars (492-479BC) with Athens being the true victor, and before the Peloponnesian War, a period of prosperity covered Athens, and they needed to devise new ways to protect themselves and expand their wealth, and how this would affect their relations with allies. ‘The Athenians and their Allies’ was an organisation led by the Athenians in the 5th century, but is now referred to as the ‘Delian League’ or the ‘Confederacy of Athens.’ The official aim of the League was, according to Thucydides, “to compensate themselves for their losses [of the Persian War] by ravaging the territory of the King of Persia.” The long term aim of the League was to ensure the freedom of…

Greek victory over the Persians in 490 to 480/479 BC

Assess the reasons for the Greek victory over the Persians in 490 to 480/479 BC. Make a judgement based on outcome, results and values. The reasons for the Greek victory against the Persians in 490 to 480/479 BC was a mixture of exceptional leadership, skilful tactics and strategy, superior weapons and soldiers, and Greek unity. Strong leadership was the most important aspect of the Greek defence, as without the intelligence and bravery of the leaders, the Greeks would have been easily defeated. As a result of the excellent leadership; Greek tactics, strategy, and unity were greatly strengthened. Combined with their better weapons and soldiers, the Greeks held the advantage and seized opportunities at the perfect moment. Also, with each victory…

The Two Sides to Every Greek: Hellene vs. Romoi

Louis De Bernieres’s novel, Corelli’s Mandolin, is a story about time and change. The story itself explores many aspects of life such as love, betrayal, chaos, tradition, history and numerous other elements that are often warped over time. De Bernieres notes that he tried to be as true to history as possible. But beneath the layers of time, change and history there is another element of Greek culture that parallels the stories within the novel. There is a continuous theme of the conflicting forces of good and evil and the changes that occur when these forces assimilate. This is the Greek dualistic concept of both nature and humanity. Beyond the exterior war that is the central theme of the novel,…

Athens vs. Sparta Reflection Essay

As all civilizations do, Athens and Sparta have provided many things for the modern world. And as everything else, both have their strengths and weaknesses. Athens focused more on education and the arts while Sparta revolved around military strength and battle. Because Sparta had such a massively influential military, we use tactics and strategies derived from them even today. They invented the Phalanx; a military formation of standing closely packed and moving forward slowly to break enemy lines. Spartans also conceived the idea of militaristic schools. They were also the first to enforce conscription. The Spartans would also train their women to fight for themselves so they would be prepared to defend their homes and lives if there was ever…

Ancient Greek and Ancient Egyptian Art Compared

Egyptian art comes from the paintings the Egyptians created in the tombs of rich people when they died. These pictures were supposed to help the dead person out when he or she reached the next world, where the Egyptians thought you lived after you died in this world. At first, carvers had a hard time painting the pictures but in about 2160 B.C. they started taking short cuts and made their work sloppier. Greek art was much different from the Egyptians art. One of their styles of art was sculpting. In Crete, between about 1700 and 1450 BC, the Minoans produced a lot of medium-sized figurines, mainly made of metal and ivory. The Greeks learned how to make big stone…

Aegean Civilization

During the Second and Third millennia BC, Aegean civilizations include three related yet diverse cultures. These cultures include the Minoan culture located on the island of Crete, the Cycladic culture located on the Cyclades Islands north of Crete, and the Mycenaean culture located on the mainland of Greece. Although there were many differences, there were many mutual traditions and styles (Janson 92). Not much is known about the Cycladic civilization except what has been learned from the art they left behind. Around 2800 BC, Cycladic female nudes made of marble are described as “Generally they have a flat, wedge-shaped body; a strong columnar neck; a tilted oval shield of a face; and a long ridge like nose” (Janson 93). The…

Battle of Marathon

In 490 B.C.E. the Battle of Marathon was a brief but important event in the war between the Greek city-states and The Persian Empire. The results of the battle had unforeseen effects on Athens and the future of Western Civilization. The Greek ‘Golden Age’, centred in Athens, brought about new forms of art, the foundations of future philosophy and redirected literature and drama. The achievements of the Athenians during this period were directly connected to the inspiration and prestige (which later translated into power) fuelled by the events at Marathon. How the events of a single day changed the entire course of Western Civilization is hard to fathom but obvious when one looks at the aftermath of that fateful event….

Greek Contributions

Contributions of Ancient Greece Many of the roots of Western society can be traced back to ancient Greece. The longest areas of contribution are architecture, medicine, and philosophy. The philosophical area of ancient Greece is one of the most important; it foundededucational laws and many other things. Also architecture was a major part of what ancient Greece left behind considering they constructed huge buildings that still stand today. Greece was known as one of the founders of modern medicine since they learned how to fix dislocated joints and broken arms. Those are the major contributions left behind from the Greek’s. One of the advancement’s that affects western civilization is architecture. Greece created huge buildings such as the Parthenon and Pantheon….

The religious beliefs and practices of Athens, Greece compared to the Gupta Empire

The great myths and religions of the world can often be traced back to a distinct few sources. The direct definition of religion is the “belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power, especially a personal God or gods.” Most of the time the religions of one culture are based on the beliefs of another or an earlier culture. The religious beliefs and practices of Athens, Greece can be quite thoroughly compared and contrasted to those of the Gupta Empire, because while they vastly differ, however there are remarkable similarities between the two. Ancient Greece was comprised of an abundant mountainous terrain, which led to the development of the polis around 750 B.C.E. Ancient Athenians were a thoughtful people,…

Ancient Greeks Contributions DBQ

Ancient Greece influenced Western Civilization in many ways. Many ideas of the Ancient Greeks came from the city-state of Athens. The Greek culture has had a very large impact on the way people have lived. The Ancient Greek civilization made significant contributions to western civilization in the areas of government, philosophy, and math and science. Now government is a system of control citizens, societies and states. It is important to have a government so you can control society as well as your armed forces for protection. As seen in document 1, which is an excerpt from Pericles’ funeral oration, the ancient Greeks were one of the first to have a democracy. Though the Athenians had a democracy it was limited…