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Gold’s Gym Essay

Gold’s gym has been the authority in fitness since 1965 dating back to the original Gold’s Gym in Venice, California. It was the place for serious fitness. Thereafter, Gold’s Gym quickly became known as “The Mecca of bodybuilding”. In 1977, Gold’s Gym received international attention when it was featured in the movie ‘Pumping Iron’ that starred Arnold Schwarzenegger and Lou Ferrigno.

Today, Gold’s Gym has expanded its fitness profile to offer all of the latest equipment and services, including group exercise, personal training, cardiovascular equipment, spinning and yoga, while maintaining its core weight training tradition. With 3.5 million members worldwide, Gold’s Gym continues to change lives by helping people achieve their individual potential.

Mission Statement: “To enhance the quality of life in the communities we serve, through our fitness philosophy, facilities, programs, and products; and to instill in the lives of people everywhere the value of health and
fitness.”

We are committed to exceeding our members’ fitness goals by utilizing our rich history established over the last 42 years of superior training, information, support and guidance provided by the largest and the best fitness organization in the world. “Service excellence is our golden rule.”

Vision: To inspire, support, and lead every member in their effort toward a healthy, productive, and fun life, and to provide a safe, fun, energetic, rewarding, and fair working environment.

We are the inspiration and the leadership that will guide the Wenatchee Valley to be the fittest community in America. We are the Customer Care benchmark.
We are passionate about helping others.
We are a great company for which to work.

 Core Values:

Respect – Have regard for others’ beliefs and viewpoints. Candor – Speak openly and honestly.
Integrity – Don’t “act” as though you have values – Be your values. If you really don’t care about other people, PLEASE don’t work here. Learning and Knowledge Sharing – Intellectual capital is our most valuable treasure. Share what you learn and be open to learn from others. Teamwork – This isn’t about you or me. It is about us. Make everyone around you look good. Humility – We are all equally important….and equally unimportant. Accountability – True accountability is the process of constantly asking yourself; “what else can I do to make things better?”

While it may have started out as a humble hard core training gym, Gold’s Gym has grown into a fitness empire. So does big mean bad? Or can corporate gyms still be a good place for independently minded personal trainers?

With hundreds of locations across the world, the mega fitness employers of hour fitness, Bally Total Fitness and Gold’s gym are going to be tempting places where personal trainers can get almost guaranteed employment. The Personal Training Job Board is packed with entry level jobs.

Gold’s Gym International, Inc. is an international chain of co-ed fitness centers commonly referred to as “gyms”. Each gym features a wide array of exercise equipment, group exercise classes and personal trainers to assist clients. Its headquarters are in Irving, Texas

Today, Gold’s Gym claims to be the largest chain of co-ed gyms in the world, with more than 750 locations in 42 states and 30 countries. Gold’s Gym has a membership of more than three and a half million, split almost equally between male and female patrons. Gold’s Gym locations are equipped with cardiovascular and strength training equipment and offer group exercise classes such as group cycling, Pilates, Latin dance yoga and stretching through the company GGX (Gold’s Group Exercise) program. Many gyms also offer basketball, swimming pools and boxing studios.

Gold’s Gym is privately owned. It was acquired from its previous owner, private equity firm Brockway Moran & Partners, by Robert Rowling’s TRT Holdings in 2004 for approximately $158 million. Brockway Moran had acquired the company in 1999. The current chief corporate officers include President and CEO Jim Snow, David Fowler as senior divisional vice president, and Aaron Watkins as senior vice president of finance and accounting.

Average Gold’s Gym Salaries: As of May 30, 2012, the average salary for gold’s gym jobs is $41,000 USD. Average gold’s gym salaries can vary greatly due to company, location, industry, experience and benefits. This salary was calculated using the average salary for all jobs with the term “gold’s gym” anywhere in the job listing.

Jobs: Employees must be at least 18 years of age. Gold’s Gym is an equal opportunity employer who recognizes the value of having a diverse workforce. It seeks and encourages qualified applicants regardless of gender, ethnicity, or other cultural or physical characteristics.

Fitness Sales Manager
Our Sales Managers are responsible for consistent improvement of club sales and operations through effective planning, implementation, use and exercise of independent judgment and discretion in determining how to best maximize profits, contain costs, and hold club employees accountable.

Personal Training Sales Manager
Personal Training Sales Managers are responsible for selling training packages for our certified personal training staff and holding Personal Training Sales Counselors and Personal Trainers accountable. Fitness Sales Counselor

A Membership Sales Counselor will actively pursue enrollment of new members through self-generated and Company-sponsored programs, promotions and referrals. This includes establishing and maintaining lead boxes; calling on new businesses for corporate accounts, obtain leads from existing members, give club tours and membership presentations, utilize computer programs to track appointments and sales.

Personal Training Sales Counselor
A Personal Training Sales Counselor will actively pursue enrollment of new members into Gold’s Gym Pro Results Personal Training packages by providing introductory training assessments, and utilizing computer programs to track appointments and sales.

Operations Manager
The job of our Operations Managers is to ensure that our members receive exceptional service from a happy, friendly staff in a clean and well-maintained facility. Operations Managers hire, train, and supervise all fitness, babysitting and janitorial staff, resolve all membership issues, update past due accounts, manage payroll and supplies budget, and uphold company standards

Club Staff
The job of our club staff is to meet, greet and check-in members and guests of Gold’s Gym, provide excellent customer service and update member’s account information using various computer applications and be assertive, enthusiastic and punctual.

Group Fitness (Aerobics)
Group Fitness Trainers are enthusiastic, professional, motivated, experienced individuals who enjoy teaching group fitness. They have experience in teaching one or several of the following formats: Cycling, Step, Latin, Hip Hop, light weight dumbbells, Kick box Cardio, Aqua, Mat Pilates and yoga.

Personal Trainer
The main responsibility of our Personal Trainers is to design and implement programs for our personal training clients. They are expected to treat all clients in a professional and compassionate manner and be prepared to advise clients of what to do during their “off day” when they are exercising on their own. In general, the trainer position requires you to be a positive fitness role model for all our clients and club members

Building Maintenance
The Building Maintenance personnel must have experience in at least one of the following specialties: wood floor refinishing, tile work, HVAC, painting, CPO, plumbing, electrical.

Janitor
The Janitor maintains the cleanliness and beauty of the club by cleaning the locker rooms, mopping floors, emptying trash containers, wiping off counters, cleaning equipment, cleaning mirrors and windows, etc.

Equipment Technician
The Equipment Technician must have a solid experience troubleshooting electrical, electromechanical and mechanical systems.

Job Descriptions

Tasks:
Operate office machines, such as photocopiers and scanners, voice mail systems, and personal computers. Answer telephones, direct calls, and take messages.
Maintain and update filing, inventory, mailing, and database systems, either manually or using a computer. Communicate with customers, employees, and other individuals to answer questions, disseminate or explain information, take orders, and address complaints. Open, sort, and route incoming mail, answer correspondence, and prepare outgoing mail.

Compile, copy, sort, and file records of office activities, business transactions, and other activities. Compute, record, and proofread data and other information, such as records or reports. Type, format, proofread, and edit correspondence and other documents, from notes or dictating machines, using computers or typewriters. Complete work schedules, manage calendars, and arrange appointments. Review files, records, and other documents to obtain information to respond to requests

. Greets each member and guests promptly, enthusiastically and with a smile to create a friendly positive entrance into the gym. Says “Hello” to all incoming guests and says “Good-bye” to all outgoing guests. Provides security and control to the front door area of the facility. Checks each member into the gym using the proper check-in procedures. Monitor check-ins to identify delinquent accounts and notifies Gym Operations Supervisor. Register all guests into the gym using proper registration procedures. Ensures that guests and appointments are directed to the appropriate fitness consultant in a prompt, professional manner. Answers phone by the third ring in a professional and courteous manner and uses proper phone greeting techniques.

Addresses callers’ requests and/or takes appropriate messages. Registers all telephone inquiries in the TI register in the Master Production Binder and transfers the call to the appropriate Fitness Consultants. Responsible for following up on telephone inquiries to ensure that the appointment was booked properly. Responds immediately to member requests, inquiries and concerns. Maintain neat appearance and wear proper uniform attire with nametag while on duty. Distributes keys, towels and other materials as needed.

Reserves time/makes appointments for tanning, special classes or other activities sponsored by the gym.

Tools:
Franking or postage machines — Postage machines
Photocopiers — Photocopying equipment
Scanners — Data input scanners
Computers — Laptop and Desktop computer
Technology:
Accounting software — Billing software; Bookkeeping software; Intuit QuickBooks software Data base user interface and query software — Alpha Software Alpha Five; IBM Check Processing Control System CPSC; Microsoft Access; St. Paul Travelers e-CARMA Document management software — Filing system software; Records management software; Transcription system software Spreadsheet software — Microsoft Excel

Word processing software — Microsoft Word
Knowledge:
Clerical —Word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology. Customer and Personal Service — Providing customer and personal services; including customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction. English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Accounting Principles — Understanding of basic accounting principles and cash processing procedures. Skills:
Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times. Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents. Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively.

Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others’ reactions and understanding why they react as they do. Time Management — Managing one’s own time and the time of others. Writing — Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience. Service Orientation — Actively looking for ways to help people. Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. Abilities:

Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences. Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand. Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing. Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person. Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.

Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern, according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations). Work Activities:

Interacting With Computers — Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person. Documenting/Recording Information — Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.

Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources. Communicating with Persons Outside Organization — Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail. Processing Information — Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data. Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work — Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work. Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships — Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time. Requirements:

Education
This occupation requires a high school diploma.
Related Experience
Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is usually needed. For example, a teller would benefit from experience working directly with the public. Job Training
Employees in these occupations need anywhere from a few months to one year of working with experienced employees. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations. Job Zone

Examples
These occupations often involve using your knowledge and skills to help others. Examples include sheet metal workers, forest fire fighters, customer service representatives, physical therapist aides, salespersons (retail), and tellers.

Tasks:
Observe participants and inform them of corrective measures necessary for skill improvement. Instruct participants in maintaining exertion levels to maximize benefits from exercise routines. Offer alternatives during classes to accommodate different levels of fitness. Plan routines, choose appropriate music, and choose different movements for each set of muscles, depending on participants’ capabilities and limitations.

Teach proper breathing techniques used during physical exertion. Evaluate individuals’ abilities, needs, and physical conditions, and develop suitable training programs to meet any special requirements. Monitor participants’ progress and adapt programs as needed. Explain and enforce safety rules and regulations governing sports, recreational activities, and the use of exercise equipment. Provide students with information and resources regarding nutrition, weight control, and lifestyle issues. Administer emergency first aid, wrap injuries, treat minor chronic disabilities, or refer injured persons to physicians.

Tools:
Balance beams — Balance boards; Balance disks
Exercise balls — Medicine balls; Weighted exercise balls
Fitness weights — Fitness jog belts; Free weights; Water ankle weights; Weighted swim vests Microphones

Technology:

Calendar and scheduling software — Appointment scheduling software; Contemporary Web Plus Appointment-Plus Data base user interface and query software — BioEx Systems Exercise Expert; DietMaster Systems DietMaster Medical software — BioEx Systems Nutrition Maker Plus

Project management software — BioEx Systems Fitness Maker; Get Physical! Software Personal Trainer Pro; Natural Fitness Concepts The Trainers Edge; Vesteon Software Personal Trainer-PDA Knowledge:

Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction. Education and Training — Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects. English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar. Psychology — Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders. Skills:

Instructing — Teaching others how to do something. Service Orientation — Actively looking for ways to help people. Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively. Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times. Learning Strategies — Selecting and using training/instructional methods. Monitoring — Monitoring individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.

Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others’ actions. Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.

Abilities:
Gross Body Coordination — The ability to coordinate the movement of your arms, legs, and torso together when the whole body is in motion. Stamina — The ability to exert yourself physically over long periods of time without getting winded or out of breath. Trunk Strength — The ability to use your abdominal and lower back muscles to support part of the body repeatedly or continuously over time without ‘giving out’ or fatiguing. Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.

Extent Flexibility — The ability to bend, stretches, twist, or reach with your body, arms, and/or legs. Dynamic Strength — The ability to exert muscle force repeatedly or continuously over time. This involves muscular endurance and resistance to muscle fatigue. Speech Clarity — The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you. Static Strength — The ability to exert maximum muscle force to lift, push, pull, or carry objects. Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.

Work Activities:
Performing General Physical Activities — Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials. Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships — Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time. Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Thinking Creatively — Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions. Coaching and Developing Others — Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills. Assisting and Caring for Others — Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.

Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person. Training and Teaching Others — Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others. Requirements:

Education
Most occupations in this zone require training in vocational schools, related on-the-job experience, or an associate’s degree. Related Experience
Previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for these occupations. For example, an electrician must have completed three or four years of apprenticeship or several years of vocational training, and often must have passed a licensing exam, in order to perform the job. Job Training

Employees in these occupations usually need one or two years of training involving both on-the-job experience and informal training with experienced workers. A recognized apprenticeship program may be associated with these occupations. Job Zone

Examples
These occupations usually involve using communication and organizational skills to coordinate, supervise, manage, or train others to accomplish goals. Examples include food service managers, electricians, agricultural technicians, legal secretaries, interviewers, and insurance sales agents. Sales Manager

Tasks:
Manage, hire, train and develop sales staff. Generates sales leads through company’s sponsored events while coordinating with the regional marketing function locally. Oversees lead generation for sales team through Company’s sponsored (walk-ins) and employee sponsored (outreach and promotions). Motivate sales staff and monitor their production levels by using the established protocols and sales system programs. Hold daily production meeting with sales team.

Establish and maintain the standard company protocol for sales tours and
price presentation. Maintain and direct training & development of the gym sales staff. Establish and maintain an active referral system with the sales team. Establish and maintain a lead box/lead bowl system and monitor on a monthly basis. Develop and retain corporate client relationships through the sales team on a monthly basis. Audit sales team on a monthly basis.

Maintain acceptable level of personal sales production. Submit monthly game plan for training, promotions and department meetings to General Manager and Area Manager. Create, implement and promote special events for the gym with regional marketing to generate new member sales. Answers phone by the third ring in a professional and courteous manner and uses proper phone greeting techniques.

Addresses callers’ requests and/or takes appropriate messages. Registers all telephone inquiries in the TI register in the Master Production Binder and transfers the call to the appropriate Fitness Consultants. Responsible for following up on telephone inquiries to ensure that the appointment was booked properly. Responds immediately to member requests, inquiries and concerns. Maintain neat appearance and wear proper uniform attire with nametag while on duty. Distributes keys, towels and other materials as needed.

Technology:
Calendar and scheduling software — Contact management software; Scheduling software Customer relationship management CRM software — Eden Sales Manager; FrontRange Solutions Goldmine software; Salesforce.com Salesforce CRM; Vanguard Software Vanguard Sales Manager Data base user interface and query software — Data entry software; Microsoft Access Electronic mail software — Email software; IBM Lotus Notes; Microsoft Outlook Spreadsheet software —
Microsoft Excel

Knowledge:
Sales and Marketing — Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. Administration and Management — Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar. Personnel and Human Resources — Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems. Economics and Accounting — Knowledge of economic and accounting principles and practices, the financial markets, banking and the analysis and reporting of financial data.

Psychology — Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders. Education and Training — Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects. Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications. Skills:

Speaking — Talking to others to convey information effectively. Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times. Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others’ actions. Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems. Monitoring — Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action. Service Orientation — Actively
looking for ways to help people. Judgment and Decision Making — Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one. Management of Personnel Resources — Motivating, developing, and directing people as they work, identifying the best people for the job.

Abilities:
Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences. Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand. Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand. Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.

Speech Recognition — The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person. Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense. Fluency of Ideas — The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a topic (the number of ideas is important, not their quality, correctness, or creativity). Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing. Work Activities:

Selling or Influencing Others — Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions. Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships — Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time. Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates — Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person. Getting Information — Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.

Communicating with Persons Outside Organization — Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources; in writing, or by telephone or e-mail. Guiding, Directing, and Motivating Subordinates — Providing guidance and direction to subordinates, including setting performance standards and monitoring performance.

Developing and Building Teams — Encouraging and building mutual trust, respect, and cooperation among team members. Making Decisions and Solving Problems — Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems. Developing Objectives and Strategies — Establishing long-range objectives and specifying the strategies and actions to achieve them. Coaching and Developing Others — Identifying the developmental needs of others and coaching, mentoring, or otherwise helping others to improve their knowledge or skills. Requirements:

Education
Most of these occupations require a four-year bachelor’s degree, but some do not. College degree preferred. High school diploma and some college courses completed is required Fitness certifications. Related Experience

A considerable amount of work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is needed for these occupations. For example, an accountant must complete four years of college and work for several years in accounting to be considered qualified. Previous experience in the fitness area as manager or sales head. Job Training

Employees in these occupations usually need several years of work-related experience, on-the-job training, and/or vocational training. Internal sales training at the fitness center. Job Zone
Examples
Many of these occupations involve coordinating, supervising, managing, or training others. Examples include accountants, sales managers, database administrators, teachers, chemists, environmental engineers, criminal investigators, and special agents.

Job Evaluation – Point Method Analysis

Defining Compensable Factors

1. Effort: earnest and conscientious activity intended to do or accomplish something through the exertion of physical or mental power. 2. Skill: ability and capacity acquired through deliberate, systematic, and sustained effort to smoothly and adaptively carryout complex activities or job functions involving ideas (cognitive skills), things (technical skills), and/or people (interpersonal skills) 3. Contact with Others: reaching out to or being in touch with another person, business or entity. For example, a salesperson may contact another person or business for a potential sale. 4. Complexity of Duties: Condition of having many diverse and autonomous but interrelated and interdependent components or parts linked through many dense interconnections. 5. Decision Making: Degree to which judgment is required to address typical problems associated with the position, and the impact that these decisions will have on the business

Effort
This factor evaluates physical and mental requirements of the job. It considers the amount of detail work, diversity of tasks, deadline pressures, and emergency situations. Degree
Description of Characteristics
1
Minimal effort required (e.g., tasks are simple and routine, and use well-defined procedures) 2
Limited effort required (e.g., tasks are simple but varied, with some limitations set by standard practices and procedures) 3
Moderate effort required (e.g., tasks have some variation and complexity,with work governed only by broad instructions and objectives) 4
Substantial effort required (e.g., tasks are highly varied and complex, involving analysis and evaluation of many complex and important factors) 5
Extreme effort required (e.g., tasks are highly varied and extremely complex, involving analysis and evaluation of many complex and important factors)

Skills
This factor evaluates the ability to exercise cognitive skills, technical skills, and/or interpersonal skills. Degree
Description of Characteristics
1
Little skill required (e.g. use of reading and writing, adding and
subtracting; following of instructions, computer literacy and proper speech, with basic health and fitness skills) 2
Limited skill required (e.g. use of simple use of formulas and formulation of schedules; operation of equipment and machines; checking of reports, forms, records, and comparable data, with fitness training skills) 3

Moderate skill required (e.g. use of different methods of analysis; interpretation of data, equivalent to 1 to 3 years’ applied training in a particular or specialized occupation with fitness training skills) 4

Substantial skill required (e.g. use of advance methods of analysis and interpretation, all varieties of measuring instruments, equivalent to complete accredited apprenticeship in a recognized occupation; or equivalent to a 2-year health, nutrition or fitness college education and skills) 5

Extreme skill required (e.g. use of higher application of principles and the performance of related practical operations, together with a comprehensive knowledge of the theories and practices, health, fitness, management and other related fields. Equivalent to completing 4 years of health, nutrition or fitness college or university education and skills)

Contact with Others
This factor evaluates personal interaction with others outside direct reporting relationships (e.g. employees from other departments, customers, vendors/suppliers, the general public, etc.) and the degree to which the employee works with or through other people to achieve organization goals. It includes internal and external contacts and evaluates the frequency of the contact, the nature of the contact (informational vs. influencing), and the degree of impact the contact has on the organization.

Degree
Description of Characteristics

Has little or no interaction with others (less than 20% of work time) and contact is internal, limited to co-workers and the direct supervisor for the
purpose of supplying or obtaining information on routine matters. (Seeking and exchanging information, engaging others in conversation, and responding to questions) 2

Has moderate interaction with others (21% to 50% of work time) and contact is internal with other departments and superiors in other areas, for the purpose of supplying or obtaining information, but may require some influencing skills, tact and discretion. (Interpreting and explaining information, outlining alternative actions, and or gaining information from others) 3

Has frequent interaction with others (more than 51% or work time) and contact is both internal and external to the organization, for the purpose of supplying or obtaining information, and may require minimal influencing skills, tact and discretion. (Interpreting and explaining information, outlining alternative actions, and gaining information from others) 4

Contact is both internal and external to the organization, for the purposes of influencing and persuading in order to carry out company policy or goals. Requires communication skills, tact, discretion, persuasion, and an awareness of dynamics and organization goals with respect to external contacts (customers, suppliers, government entities, the community, or others) to gain cooperation. (Convincing other people, resolving disagreements, leading group activities, making presentations, or counselling) 5

Contact is both internal and external to the organization, primarily with top management levels, for the purposes of influencing and persuading in order to carry out company goals. Requires an awareness of strategy and timing. May involve difficult or sensitive negotiations requiring considerable tact, discretion, communication skills, and persuasiveness. (Formal or informal negotiations, resolution of complex situations, formalized debates or presentations)

Complexity of Duties
This factor evaluates the complexity of duties with regards to the degree of independent action, standardized job duties, exercise of judgement, job decisions, exercise of discretion, resourcefulness, or creativity in devising methods, procedures, services or products. Degree

Description of Characteristics

Little Judgement: Understands and follows simple instructions. 2
Some Judgement: Follows detailed instructions and standard procedures to perform repetitive or routine duties. 3
Simple Analytical Judgement: Plans and performs varied duties requiring an extensive knowledge of a particular field. Uses a wide range of procedures. 4
Complex Analytical Judgement: Plans and performs a wide variety of duties requiring a broad knowledge of company policies and procedures in addition to extensive knowledge of a particular field. 5

Advanced Analytical Judgement: Plans and performs difficult work without set precedent or procedures. Involves highly technical or involved projects that have new or constantly changing problems.

Decision Making
This factor evaluates the thought process of selecting a logical choice from the available options. When trying to make a good decision, a person must weigh the positives and negatives of each option, and consider all the alternatives. For effective decision-making, a person must be able to forecast the outcome of each option as well, and based on all these items, determine which option is the best for that particular situation. Degree

Description of Characteristics
Requires few decisions and duties are usually very standardized. 2
Exercises judgement to analyze facts or conditions to determine what action should be taken using standard practices. 3
Requires minor decision making.

Requires outstanding judgement and initiative to deal with complex factors not easily evaluated. Makes decisions based on precedent and company policies. 5
Ingenuity and exceptional judgement necessary to deal with not easily evaluated factors and to interpret results. Makes decisions that involve a great deal of responsibility.

Job Description for Customer Service Representative/Front Desk

Processes orders, prepares correspondence, and fulfills customer needs to ensure customer satisfaction. Requires a high school diploma or equivalent and 0-3 years of experience in the field or in a related area. Has knowledge of commonly-used concepts, practices, and procedures within a particular field. Relies on instructions and pre-established guidelines to perform the functions of the job. Works under immediate supervision. Primary job functions do not typically require exercising independent judgment. Typically reports to a supervisor or manager. Customer Service Representative I – U.S. National Averages

The median expected salary for a typical Customer Service Representative I in the United States is $30,380. This basic market pricing report was prepared using our Certified Compensation Professionals’ analysis of survey data collected from thousands of HR departments at employers of all sizes, industries and geographies.

Additional Information:
O’net Source:
Median wages (2011)
$13.07 hourly, $27,190 annual

Job Description for Fitness Instructor

Coordinates all fitness programs for a facility. Organizes and instructs exercise classes for all fitness levels. Ensures that all participants are properly trained on the use of the facility’s exercise equipment. Responsible for making sure that the exercise area and equipment are safe and clean. May require a bachelor’s degree in area of specialty and 2-4 years of experience in the field or in a related area. Familiar with standard concepts, practices, and procedures within a particular field. Relies on experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals. Performs a variety of tasks. Works under general supervision. A certain degree of creativity and latitude is required. Typically reports to a supervisor.

Source: HR Reported data as of June 2012

The median expected salary for a typical Fitness Instructor in the United States is $47,240. This basic market pricing report was prepared using our Certified Compensation Professionals’ analysis of survey data collected from thousands of HR departments at employers of all sizes,
industries and geographies.

Job Description for Sales

Ensures the maximum effectiveness of the sales force by developing and implementing training programs. Designs and delivers training sessions on company products, business practices, and other topics as needed. Monitors and reports on the effectiveness of training programs and may conduct initial needs analysis. Requires a bachelor’s degree in a related area and 0-2 years of experience in the field or in a related area.

Has knowledge of commonly-used concepts, practices, and procedures within a particular field. Relies on instructions and pre-established guidelines to perform the functions of the job. Works under immediate supervision. Primary job functions do not typically require exercising independent judgment. Typically reports to a supervisor or manager. Directs and oversees an organization’s sales policies, objectives, and initiatives. Sets short- and long-term sales strategies and evaluates effectiveness of current sales programs. Relies on extensive experience and judgment to plan and accomplish goals.

Conclusion

Recent industry compensation surveys state that employees remain in their jobs for 1 year or more. Though employee motivation is strongly derived from an individual’s passion for his or her work, compensation plays a major role in satisfaction and retention. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, fitness instructor’s average salary is $20.25 per hour, while rates for specialty instructors, yoga/Pilates instructors, group fitness instructors and personal trainers range from $23.75 to $30.50 per hour, on average. Knowing how fitness jobs are positioned within the wider employment market can help keep the industry competitive. However, with increasing numbers of career fitness professionals, progressive salary changes within the industry are perhaps equally important. Gold’s Gym follows a lag policy and although it has remained in the industry for the past decades, it is still one of the most criticized gyms in America unfavorable reviews.

Reference:
http://www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/personal-trainer-salary-SRCH_KO0,16.htm http://www.bls.gov/ooh/personal-care-and-service/fitness-trainers-and-instructors.htm http://www.careerbliss.com/salary/golds-gym-salaries-284979/ http://www.bls.gov/ooh/personal-care-and-service/fitness-trainers-and-instructors.htm http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/43-9061.00#AdditionalInformation http://swb.salary.com/salarywizard

http://www.simplyhired.com/a/salary/search/q-gold’s+gym
http://www.lafitness.com/pages/employment.aspx
http://www1.salary.com/Personal-Trainer-salary.html
http://www.glassdoor.com/Salary/LA-Fitness-Salaries-E12445.htm


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