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George Orwell Essay Topics & Paper Examples

1984 by George Orwell

Nineteen Eighty-Four is a novel by George Orwell published in 1949. It is a dystopian andsatirical novel set in Oceania, where society is tyrannized by The Party and its totalitarianideology.[1] The Oceanian province of Airstrip One is a world of perpetual war, omnipresent government surveillance, and public mind control, dictated by a political systemeuphemistically named English Socialism (Ingsoc) under the control of a privileged Inner Party elite that persecutes all individualism and independent thinking as thoughtcrimes.[2]Their tyranny is headed by Big Brother, the quasi-divine Party leader who enjoys an intensecult of personality, but who may not even exist. Big Brother and the Party justify their rule in the name of a supposed greater good.[1] The protagonist of the novel, Winston…

Theme of Betrayal in the Novel “1984” by George Orwell

In the novel “1984” by George Orwell the theme of betrayal is reoccurring throughout. We see different elements of betrayal in each part of this book. From the reader’s introduction into the society of Oceania. To the events leading up to the ultimate betrayal. The character that we see this world through is Winston Smith. His experience is meant to be that of the average party member. What he goes through could be the same as many others, giving the sense of how deeply betrayal is engrained into the world of “1984.” In the first part of the book Winston Smith is introduced as a party member who has a slightly rebellious side. His world is full of telescreens, hidden…

Belonging Term Paper

Belonging is just as much about exclusion as it is about fitting in. Belonging is a concept wholly linked to the morality and social connections one exercises. These factors foster the sentiments of alienation and acceptance hence showing how belonging is just as much about exclusion than fitting in. It is these factors that derive one’s belonging in society and hence some are excluded naturally. This collated idea is portrayed in Raimond Gaita’s memoir Romulus my father which is supported by George orwell’s 1984. Both texts emphasise the conundrum of belonging and how exclusion can be present with belonging as well as having the ability to fit in. Gaita expresses the irony of belonging in his memoir Romulus my father…

1984- Orwel’s Parallelism to Modern Times

Orwell wrote at a time when communism seemed likely to spread across the word, which is a similar situation that we see today in some countries. Studying the Orwell’s works is relevant as it parallels with modern times. Orwell’s writing mostly focused on the nature of human in the society; his opinion about the non-democratic world and central authority focused in social and political areas. He wanted to educate people and expose everything he was against. Through the use of symbolism, extended metaphors and intensive imagery, Orwell wrote “naturalistic novels with unhappy endings, full of detailed descriptions and arresting similes” (Orwell, Why I Write) thus turning his harsh words into an art form. In his essay, ‘Why I Write’, Orwell…

What Is a Perfect Government

What is a perfect government? Is it an ideal place for any person? A utopia? In 1984 by George Orwell, he portrays a totalitarian government called “Big Brother.” The crux of his government is total control with no laws, yet no personality or freedom. It is seemed to be all-knowing, all-powerful, and indestructible. But the question is, could it be perfection? The simple answer is no it is not, because of the harsh nature, the all controlling, and people having no rights. Forget about being just and forget about being understanding. There is no redemption for wrong doing. Every person is not perfect; however the government expects nothing less. “People simply disappeared, always during the night. Your name was removed…

Fluency Reading Plan

Brief Synopsis- The story takes place on Manor Farm and has a third person perspective. The animals on the farm are unhappy with their current conditions. Led by a few pigs they revolt against the farmer that housed them. They hope to form a utopian farm for all animals. However, Napoleon (one of the pigs that started the revolution) starts to manipulate the animals and the humans around the farm. The farm starts to resemble its former self and Major begins to resemble the villainous farmer. This book is basically depicting communism in an interesting way. Overview of the Unit Reading fluency is an extremely difficult area to assess and instruct. In general, there are three areas that are addressed…

The Power of Language

George Orwell, the writer of many highly regarded literary works, is extremely interested in the power of language, mainly how it is abused. By analyzing two of his works, 1984 and Politics and The English Language, it is clear that Orwell is using his writing to bring awareness to the dangers of the manipulation, misuse, and decline of language. In 1984 he demonstrates how language can be used to control thought and manipulate the past. This is proven throughout the novel by examining the language of Newspeak and how it is key to controlling the totalitarian state, and how using language to alter and manipulate history can shape reality. In his essay Politics and the English Language Orwell once again…

1984 Expository Essay

The Book 1984 was written by George Orwell shortly after W.W.II. The book really shows us what would happen if the government gets too powerful. The world of 1984 is so organize that it has many high technologies to keep people on line or more importantly is to control. However, our world is much more different, we have our own individualism, freedom, and power. First of all, our world is much more different than the world of 1984, because we have our own individualism. In the world of 1984 is much more different than that. You have no individualism, everything you do is been monitor by the telescreen, which is everywhere in the world of 1984. It picks up every…

1984 and Metropolis Essay

The quote “The object of power is power” is heavily supported by George Orwell’s 1949 novel ‘1984’ and Fritz Lang’s 1927 film ‘Metropolis’ through their intertextual connections and shared perspectives. Both texts were composed around the context of pre and post World War 2 which is clearly evident through their settings, characterisation, themes and ideas. Through Orwell’s and Fritz’s use of dystopic societies, empowerment of women and detrimental dictatorship rule it is blatant that George Orwell’s quote “The object of power is power” is quite strongly supported by the intertextual connections and shared perspectives of Orwell’s ‘1984’ and Lang’s ‘Metropolis’. Through the use of Orwell’s and Lang’s intertextual connections of political reform and shared perspectives of dystopic societies it becomes…

Shooting an Elephant

George Orwell’s essay “Shooting an Elephant” was a first-person narration by an Indian Imperial Police officer. Set in British colony of Burma during the early 20th century, the officer was seen as white foreign repressive authority figure. His relationship with Burmese natives was poor. The officer sympathized with the feelings of the Burmese, but still resented them. The story revolved around an elephant that killed a Burmese man and the officer’s moral dilemma about having to shoot it. A large crowd gathered wanting the beast dead, while the officer deliberated the elephant’s fate. The officer shot several times wounding the elephant. Unable to watch the elephant suffer the officer left, while the crowd stayed to watch it died slowly in…

Compare and Contrast 1984-Brave New World

“ Do you see, then, what kind of world we are creating? ” (Orwell, 1950 p. 267)George Orwell, author of 1984 released in 1950, present the idea of a society that proves to be a dystopia as it is completely based on fear and rarely does one see happiness while in the other hand, Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World presents the idea of a functional utopia were feelings are destroyed and no one is unhappy because they don’t know happiness but all this could change by the hands of one outcast. These two societies ruled in different ways-one through fear and the other through psychological and physical manipulation- present successful ways to maintain order and power, although they differ greatly…

Actual Outcomes of Paris Peace Conference

Down and out in Paris and London is the work of an elite author by name George Orwell which was published in 1933. It explains in two parts, the subject of poverty about two cities. It gives an account of his survival in Paris and his experience as a casual laborer. In his second part he tells of his life in London. This he uses the viewpoint of a tramp and what accommodation is available. This book so compelling as it is written in a way that it gives a personal touch as Orwell tells of his opinions. George Orwell visualizes how poverty can pull people together as they try to find a solution to their predicaments. He gives a…

A Range Of Problems In The Future

‘The world will have to grapple with a range of problems in the future’ The world will inevitably change as time continues to expose the past’s perception of the future to the now. As the earth ages, generations to come adapt to the new world they perceive to be as It is near impossible for every parent to educate their young on everything they have ever learned; thus attitudes and morals are continually fluctuating. It is undeniable that it has already affected society it is evident throughout today’s problems that were never pondered upon by older generations such as the rapid advances in technology. The future can only change, and will encounter many dilemmas along the way. Earth already has…

Macbeth and Animal Farm Analysis

Explore the ways ambition is presented and developed in the texts Macbeth and Animal Farm. Macbeth and Animal farm have many common elements that can be paralleled between the two texts. One of the main ideas is the way the two main characters, Macbeth and Napoleon have an intense ambition and languish to have control over others which they take by force and their desperate attempts to contain it. William Shakespeare portrays Macbeth as a cold-blooded, power-hungry and ambitious tyrant, blinded by his burning desire to be authoritative, who will go to extreme measures to achieve his goals. On the contrary, George Orwell shows Napoleon as a manipulative character who hides his true intentions (much like Macbeth) from all those…

Metropolis and Nineteen Eighty-Four

The question (adapted from 2014 HSC) Rebellion and revolution are ideas which connect Metropolis and Nineteen Eighty-Four. How do these two texts from different contexts reflect changing perspectives on this idea? What it requires Both texts are connected by an exploration of rebellion and revolution that have direct relevance to the composers and their audiences. Compare and contrast the similarities and differences of the way each text portrays rebellion and revolution, taking into account context, audience, language and textual form. Prescribed texts: Metropolis (1929), directed by Fritz Lang (film) Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) by George Orwell (novel) Introduction begins with broader positioning of thesis, then introduces text followed by thesis statement which suggests contextual links When distribution of power in a…

Analysis of Rudyard Kipling’s “The Bridegroom”

During the First World War, death was a constant threat. Soldiers faced it every day in the trenches, and more succumbed to it. Rudyard Kipling’s Epitaphs of War represents the impact those deaths had across much of the world. “The Bridegroom” exposes the last thoughts of a dying soldier through an extended metaphor, personification and tone. First of all, the title and first stanza reveal that the speaker, a young soldier, is either dying or already dead. Traditionally, a bridegroom defines a man on his wedding day. In this poem, Kipling personifies the bride as death and therefore the title refers to a man on his last day. The speaker is a soldier fighting in the trenches, writing or at…

Song Analysis

What is the overall “message” or theme of the song? In a paragraph, summarize in your own words what the song is saying. The lyrics of the song “Hall of Fame” (by Script Ft. Will.i.Am) have an overall message to never give up and to fulfill your goals. The song is very motivational to the listener and lets you know that you can achieve anything if you put the effort to try. This song creates feeling of strength, confidence and will-power. It gives me the desire to stand up and aim for the impossible. It encourages me to make my dreams into reality because one day I will be acknowledged for all the hard work. Everything will be worth it…

Haugen Julia versus Winston Contrast Essay

In 1984, by George Orwell, the two main characters, Julia and Winston, provide a telling thrill to the readers through their passion for each other and for rebellion. Through further character analysis, one can see that Julia and Winston share similar characteristics, like rebelling against the party. But in many more ways are they very different. The brown-haired Julia, with voluptuous curves puts up a front that she is a part of the Junior Anti-Sex league and is as orthodox about the Parties values and one can get. Upon further reading the book, Julia develops into a promiscuous, rebellious girl but does not seem to care about upsetting the government, but only wanting to have the ability to do whatever…

Dystopian Society

Compare the dystopian societies, and the methods used to create them, in ‘The Handmaids Tale’ by Margaret Atwood, and ‘1984’ by George Orwell (paying particular attention to the representation of gender). The futuristic and oppressive themes that define a dystopian society are in ‘1984’ by George Orwell and ‘The Handmaids Tale’ (THT) by Margaret Atwood. These forms of society feature contrasting types of repressive social control and these stories often explore the concept of humans abusing technology or the rights of people. Dystopian societies are often imagined as police states, with unlimited power over the citizens. Although many elements of a dystopian society can be seen in ‘The Handmaids Tale’ and ‘1984’, the authors, the two novels explore the extreme…

Characters in Animal Farm

The over worked and malnourished animals over throw the humans in charge and took power; only to find that the obligation of freedom maybe more dangerous. Out of all the animals, however, one is sure to stand out. That animal is Boxer, the farm’s hardest and strongest worker. George Orwell’s novel, Animal Farm, is an allegory that reflects events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917, and then on into the Stalinist Era in the Soviet Union. Through a depiction of Boxer, George Orwell allows the reader to make a discernment of the Russian proletariat’s loyalty and hardworking skills, by presenting him as an allegiant, reputable, diligent worker. From the beginning to the end, Boxer remains a diligent worker…

Animal Farm/V for Vendetta

In many great texts concerning the politics, it can be observed that the context in which the piece was created greatly influences the ways in which values and themes are presented and the form in which it is produced. Major ground shaking events have the power to transform paradigms of individuals and whole societies, and in turn morph and influence the themes a text created in the same time period implores. Warner Brother’s 2005 film “V for Vendetta” and George Orwell’s 1945 novelette “Animal Farm” both deal with concepts present in the political climates of their times and the problems associated with them; the cost of apathy towards injustice, propaganda and its influence, and the crippling aspect of fear. The…

The Dream Betrayed

“All animals are created equal, but some animals are more equal than others” is a single commandment in animal farm that the selfish pigs made to their own advantage. The novel “Animal Farm” by George Orwell is about the rebellion of animals that concede their dream to their own leaders. It all started with the differences between the animals, then led to the destruction of their freedom. The pigs took all of what they wanted without restraint to their appetite and their greediness. Altering the seven commandments was tricky because the other animals could have noticed. The pigs shouldn’t have been so greedy, taking all the milk, apples, barley, and whiskey, it was a definite risk of having the rest…

An Analysis of Rebellion in George Orwell’s 1984

As a new society unfolds, so do new values and authority. In 1984, George Orwell presents a futuristic vision of the power of government as well as its social conventions. Primarily, Orwell uses Winston Smith to exhibit the effects that government control can have on morality. Winston lives in Oceania where “The Party” exploits its complete power by controlling people emotionally and mentally. However, this disturbs Winston who subsequently challenges The Party and is provoked into becoming a rebel. He recognizes that he is at the point of no return; consequently, he marches blindly ahead in the hope of defeating The Party. However, Winton’s defiant nature is quickly extinguished after he is caught and tormented for committing subversive acts. The…

“Nineteen Eighty-Four” by George Orwell

Winstons statement is vague and must be properly addressed before we can access its validity. The word hope in itself is deliberately ambiguous as Winston fails to mention what this hope is for. Winston may be talking about hope of revolution and the overthrow of government as a horse shaking flies. For this there is ultimately almost no hope in the proles due to the futility expressed in the novels ending as even our socially aware narrator succumbs to the guile of Big Brother. However, much more than this Winston may be talking about hope for the future, hope for freedom from social oppression and the dictatorial regime of the Party, hope for the end goal of this revolution. Winston…

George Orwell’s “The Lion and the Unicorn”

George Orwell, the author of ”The Lion and the Unicorn: Socialism and the English Genius,” wrote this essay during the British leadership crisis in the beginnings of World War II. Wanting to unify the English, he reminds them of their past and how it makes them stand out as a nation. While writing to the elite intellectuals, he also worked to unify the middle and working classes. He writes to the English people to relate to them through maintaining their tradition, culture, and faith in the government by using culture and customs that both are familiar to and will unite the country. In this way, he reminds the people that although they may be different they all live in the…

George Orwell’s 1984 and Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451

Imagine this, a perfect world of complete harmony and justice. There is no wrong, and there is no right. There is only utopia. It might be the perfect place where people want to live, or the place that people dream about. It might even be the picture of the future. However, this Utopian world is revealed to have flaws. It lacks many of the qualities of life that exist today. Thus the Utopian world isn’t so Utopian anymore. And the more that is revealed about the world, the more horrible it becomes. Soon, it becomes a nightmare, a world of illusions, of lies. That is the dystopic world that authors such as Bradbury and George Orwell pictures in their books,…

An Analysis of Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant”

In “Shooting an Elephant,” George Orwell finds himself in a difficult situation involving an elephant. The fate of the elephant lies in his hands. Only he can make the final decision. In the end, due to Orwell’s decision, the elephant lay dying in a pool of blood. Orwell wins the sympathy of readers by expressing the pressure he feels as an Anglo-Indian in Burma, struggling with his morals, and showing a sense of compassion for the dying animal. Readers sympathize with Orwell because they can relate to his emotions in the moments before the shooting. Being the white “leader,” he should have been able to make an independent decision, but was influenced by the “natives” (Orwell 101). Orwell describes his…

Methods of Suppression in 1984

George Orwell’s anti-utopian novel 1984 paints a picture of a society in which the individual has no freedom, hope, or feeling. Three super states called Oceania, Eurasia, and Eastasia, divide and ravage the earth with perpetual war between them. The story takes place in Oceania, which consists of the Americas as well as Great Brittan. Nineteen-eighty Four chronicles Winston Smith’s struggle to fight against the forever-reining, oppressive social system called the Party. Throughout 1984 several central themes through which the Party controls its members unfold – the first theme is dehumanization, the second theme is encroachment of privacy, and third theme is subtle erosions of freedom. Dehumanization, which clearly presides as the foremost theme in Orwell’s novel, occurs as the…

Animal Farm And A Utopian Society

Based on George Orwell’s Animal Farm a utopian society can not be achieved. A perfect world is impossible to achieve because you will always get someone who takes charge and overrules the people. In the book the animals successfully rebel from the owner of the farm, Mr. Jones. After the rebellion as a whole the animals set up some rules and commandments. At this point the animals feel that they have created a utopia, or a perfect world. They feel they can work hard for a while and then be rewarded with retirement. Eventually there becomes a superior group of animals that convince the rest of the animals that they are of higher intelligence. With this in mind they then…

A Comparative Essay Between 1984 and Brave New World

It is interesting to note, before anything, the similarities between Brave New World and 1984. Firstly and rather obviously, they are both prophetic novels, they were both written in turbulent times, both suffering changes that could revert the future of the world. When 1984 was written, the world had just gotten out of a second war and the surprising rise of communism and their totalitarian government was frightening most of the western world. In George Orwell’s novel, the main concern seems to be the overtaking of a supreme, socialist totalitarian government/dictatorship. On the other hand, when Brave New World was written, the world had just been swept by a wave of mass production and consumerism, and that too is reflected…