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Frankenstein Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Frankenstein and Prometheus

Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein can be compared to the myth Prometheus by J.M Hunt in several ways. Frankenstein and Prometheus both created life in their own way and faced consequences that they had not expected to encounter although they differed in that Frankenstein abandoned his creation and abhorred him whereas Prometheus wanted to help and care for his creation. Both Frankenstein and Prometheus developed creations easily but did not realize the consequences behind it. In the novel Frankenstein Victor always wanted to understand the cause of life and death and he set his mind into finding the answer. “I collected the instruments of life around me, that I might infuse a spark of being into the lifeless thing that lay…

Nature in Frankenstein

Within Frankenstein, Shelley uses nature as a corrective agent for Victor Frankenstein, one of the main characters. While he is in bereavement by the murders of his friends and family members, he frequently seeks nature for relaxation and help to guide him to victory. To start with Shelley uses natural metaphors to describe Victor’s childhood. “I find it arise, like a mountain river, from ignoble and almost forgotten sources”. The use of Mountain River to describe feelings that victor holds is the beginning of a theme that is continued throughout the book. This introduction to nature and human feeling’s, shows how Shelley would rather use metaphors of a natural setting rather than other descriptions. Instead of relating Victor’s feelings to…

Frankenstein and Blade Runner

The film Blade Runner by Ridley Scott and the gothic novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley reveal key insights concerning humanity through the contrasting texts. The composers successfully introduce and deal with the issues of humanity by challenging the established values of their times reflected to the responder through the provocative language and film techniques. Both texts are cautionary tales which explore insights of humanity revealing the greed for power and political control through science and technology, need for love and affection and a need for identity and self knowledge. Both texts similarly explore the insights of humanity’s greed and urge for power to control through science and the consequences that follow. Composed in a time of major scientific development, Shelley’s…

Frankenstein Comparative Paper

Compare the Frankenstein novel with Kenneth Branagh’s film version. Which is the better example of a gothic text? Gothic texts enable audiences to be immersed in a world of the supernatural involving horror and romance. Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein, and the film adaptation directed by Kenneth Branagh, are both texts that portray the gothic genre. The film may share the same gothic elements as in the novel; however the novel allows the reader to use their own imagination, thus bringing to life this genre. Through the comparison of supernatural events, heightened emotions and the atmosphere of mystery and suspense in both literary mediums of Frankenstein, the differences and similarities will be compared to find the better example of a gothic…

Frankenstein Summary

Frankenstein opens with a preface, signed by Mary Shelley but commonly supposed to have been written by her husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley. It states that the novel was begun during a summer vacation in the Swiss Alps, when unseasonably rainy weather and nights spent reading German ghost stories inspired the author and her literary companions to engage in a ghost story writing contest, of which this work is the only completed product. Summary: Letter 1 The novel itself begins with a series of letters from the explorer Robert Walton to his sister, Margaret Saville. Walton, a well-to-do Englishman with a passion for seafaring, is the captain of a ship headed on a dangerous voyage to the North Pole. In the…

Victor Frankenstein

In the beginning we find Victor growing up in a wealthy family, where he is encouraged to seek a greater understanding of the world around him through science. He is surrounded by loving family and friends and appears to grow up a normal boy with the exception of his obsession of studying outdated theories of science that focused on the natural wonders. Inspired by his youthful obsession, Victor leaves for the University of Ingolstadt to pursue his passions; however, tragedy strikes a few days before with the passing of his mother from scarlet fever. We can only imagine the distraught Frankenstein traveling to school with the sadness that must have plagued him during this time, and how when he arrived…

The Importance of Names in Frankenstein and the Handmaid’s Tale

Names are a very important thing that most people are given shortly after birth. A name is “the word or words that a person, thing or place is known by” (Cambridge Online Dictionary (2011), Retrieved November 6th 2012). Names are given to identify an individual in replace of calling someone “it”, a term used to refer to something inanimate or without a name. A name shows that someone loves us enough to name us; to think about it with care and affection. Names surrounding the author have a great influence also and the main character in Frankenstein shares the penname of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Shelley’s husband. In The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood uses the influence of feminism to create…

Extract from Frankenstein and in Cold Blood

This essay will be analysing the way in which the theme of wasted lives is portrayed throughout my chosen extracts. My chosen extracts are, an extract from chapter 16 of Frankenstein (FS) by Mary Shelly a gothic novel with features of the Romantic Movement. And an extract from chapter 3 of In Cold Blood (ICB) by Truman Capote, a faction novel (a novel written based on facts). In the F.S extract we are seeing the creature’s view of his killing of William and also his framing of Justine for the murder. Much the same in the ICB extract where it is Perry’s point of view of the murder of the Clutter family. In this extract we also see Capote input…

Explore the Theme of Monstrosity in Frankenstein

Montrosity is a key in Frankenstein, and it affects both the Creature and Victor, whilst at the same time , Shelley argues that society is monstrous through injustices of the time and the social conventions. Frankenstein could be said to be the monster himself- when he says “miserable monster” whom “I had created”, we see Shelley implicitly suggest, through the alliterative phrase, that just as “Adam was created in God’s image” so too was the Creature born in the image of Victor. Moreover, the idea that Frankenstein is himself the monster is reinforced by “or rather cell”. “Cell” refers to a prison cell, and is used symbolically to represent the idea that just like a cell is for criminals, who…

Frankenstein and How to Read Literature

The pursuit of knowledge is the very heart of Frankenstein. Mary Shelley depicts how the very pursuit, thirst for knowledge ruined one man’s life. Victor’s life is consumed by a want for more knowledge and Mary Shelley shows the before and after effects of that relentless pursuit. Robert Walton life could also be ruined by an endless need for more knowledge. The ruthless pursuit of knowledge, of reaching for a distant light proves dangerous to both Victor and Robert. The monster, Victor’s act of creation, eventually results in the destruction of everyone dear to him and Robert’s expedition is dangerously encased sheets of ice. It is here that the two characters pursuit of knowledge diverges. Victor’s telling of his story…

Frankenstein Film Adaptation Comparison

Kenneth Branagh’s 1994 film adaptation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein greatly differed from the original novel written in 1818. Not only were certain elements altered however in addition, the personalities of several major characters, and how the audience portrays them was quite different. For example, the main distinction within the novel and the film are the role of women. In the novel, Elizabeth is treated as a trophy; her opinions are not important to Victor. In the novel, Victor treats women passively and feels superiority to them; he cannot take advice from them. Women play a more relaxed role in the novel. They do not make any decisions, and allow me to take advantage of them. This is seen primarily when…

Frankenstein Movie Version vs. Mary Shelley’s Novel

In 1957 British Production Company Hammer Films launched their own series of adaptations of Frankenstein with the first film entitled “The Curse of Frankenstein”. The Frankenstein’s myth was revived once again. This time it was more different from the Universal Studios own version. The prominent element in the Universal Series was the monster but Hammer chose the person of Victor Frankenstein as focal point and subject of the story. The Curse of Frankenstein is set around 1880. Baron Victor Frankenstein and his new teacher Paul Krempe became close companions. They started their experiments and their first success was the reanimation of a puppy. After several years they want to experiment it on humans. They stole the body of a hanged…

Similarities in Frankenstein and Monster

Frankenstein is regarded one of the best Gothic novels because it beautifully and artistically blends the natural philosophy, scientific spirit of 19th century, Mary Shelley’s own literary influences and her individual vision and literary craft. A close analysis of her (Mary Shelley’s) subjective approach and critical evaluation of the text of novel reinforces the truth that Percy Shelley’s proclaimed of his wife’s writing. He says: (Frankenstein is) one of the most original and complete productions of the day. We debate with ourselves in wonder, as we read it, what could have been the Series of thoughts what could have been the peculiar experiences that Awakened them which conduced, in the author’s mind, to the astonishing Combinations of motives and incidents…

Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein or Modern Prometheus (1831) is considered as one of the oldest yet significantly popularized literature that symbolizes the tandem of Victor Frankenstein and the Creature. The horrendous creation, Frankenstein –the Modern Prometheus, is used to symbolize Mary Shelley’s time period wherein men are continuously advancing the level of possible knowledge present in their society. From the scientist Victor Frankenstein to the monster named as the Creature, Shelley creates an innovative argument that illustrates the trends of the progressive industrialization in European countries. Shelley’s Frankenstein involves with the societal dilemma of men’s overreaching efforts against the limitations of science and Mother Nature by initiating actions to dehumanize the conception of life. II. Brief Summary Shelley’s Frankenstein had give…

A Family Study of Victor Frankenstein and his Monster

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is an exploration of the relationship between parent and child. Inspired in many ways by Mary Shelley’s own experiences as a motherless child and a grieving mother, Victor’s tale follows a linear trail of decline traceable to his mother’s death. Up until that point, though fascinated with alchemy and life science, Victor’s ideas retain a manner of scientific remove. His egotism is controlled and does not boast a power over life or death. It is only when confronted with death that the fissures begin to appear and the idyllic scenes from his childhood begin to show the full remove of affection Victor experienced. Unable to deal with this abandonment realistically, he manipulates death to create renewed animation…

Sympathy for Frankenstein

In the eighteenth century novel Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, the protagonist creates a creature commonly known as Frankenstein. From a young age when his mother past away, the main character, Victor Frankenstein had a passion to create life. With this passion, Victor set out for the University of Geneva in Switzerland. Here Victor acquired the knowledge allowing him to execute his plan. Victor was interested in bringing the dead back to life, thus leading to his downfall. After many tries he finally accomplished the creation of a monster. The creation was extremely hideous, but far more real than Victor could have imagined. In the years that would follow, the monsters eloquence and persuasiveness would allow him to not be blamed…

Frankenstein Ch 1-10 Quote Analysis

Chapter 1 “I was their plaything and their idol, and something better- their child, the innocent and helpless creature bestowed on them by Heaven, whom to bring up to good, and whose future lot it was in their hands to direct to happiness or misery, according as they fulfilled their duties towards me. With this deep consciousness of what they owed towards the being to which they had given life.” This quote expresses Victor Frankenstein’s beliefs that it was up to this parents to make him happy and to succeed in life. The last line expresses a belief that any parent owed it to their child happiness and love by bringing them to life. Frankenstein is being hypocritical, putting so…

Frankenstein

According to mental health specialists, Borderline personality disorder is a serious mental illness and those afflicted have issues with regulating their emotions, behaviors, and thoughts. On top of that, they have a hard time maintaining relationships with others because of their reactions to certain situations or ideas, and are found to be “unstable”. Not unlike the men in Shelley’s Frankenstein, a person with, the somewhat misnomered, illness is very impressionable to the various occurrences in their life. It is true that with age and as the story goes on, that the toll of being emotionally unstable and incapable of dealing with the repercussions of their actions increases and is reflected in the personalities of the men in Frankenstein. Starting with…

Frankenstein and Human Cloning

What is life? What defines a person? Do you believe humans should have the right to create life? Are there any consequences? In 1831 Mary Shelly wrote Frankenstein or; The Modern Prometheus, a magnificent depiction of a man taking up God’s role of creator of life. Victor wanted to achieve biological immortality. Yet, within the instance of success Victor outright rejected his creation as “monstrous”, a unit for being unworthy of human life. In this paper, I argue that Frankenstein and the idea cloning have a lot in common, because the two topics share pros and cons on behalf of their out coming result. Victor Frankenstein’s monster compared to cloning takes place without the act of a sexual union between…

Grendel and Frankenstein

Grendel, the main character in the novel Grendel by John Gardner, and the Monster, the main character in the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley are both consumed by the desire to discover the nature and secret of human life. They are both monsters and so both are outsiders in the world of humans, but they try to integrate themselves into the society, only to be shunned universally. Their nature of monstrosity lies at the center of the action since they are being rejected by the society. Their response to this rejection paves the way to the discovery of human nature. Grendel the monster has an ambiguous characterization. Although he displays nothing but the most primitive human qualities with the strong…

The Suffering of Frankenstein

Frankenstein makes clear of Frankenstein’s innocence before everything becomes tragic. The reader is shown his largely happy and privileged childhood, his blameless obsession with knowledge, and how he arrived at studying what would soon become his downfall. When Frankenstein creates the monster the immediate effect is his disappointment and exhaustion. He is sickened by his own work and regrets the creation from the moment he saw it in the way everyone else will see it. Frankenstein is our tragic figure but the effects of his tragic flaw do not end with his own suffering. A few years after the night when the monster began to breathe, he murders Frankenstein’s brother in Geneva. The feelings evoked by this action are much…

Frankenstein

Throughout the years, Hollywood has been notorious for taking classic novels, and turning them into big blockbuster movies. However, in order for Hollywood to make money, they feel the need to make drastic changes to the characters and plot so that the average everyday moviegoer will be entertained. Frankenstein: Or the Modern Prometheus is no exception to this and it can be shown through the many different movies that have been adapted from Mary Shelly’s timeless novel. In the original text, Frankenstein’s monster is portrayed as an intelligent creature that can run like a gazelle and can speak eloquently. However, Hollywood’s version is very different and many differences can be pointed out through the novel. For example, in the novel…

Playing God in Today’s World

The two fictional characters who “play God” in their own lives are two doctors, one of philosophy (Faustus) and one of medicine (Frankenstein) and, in real life, it is anyone who takes power over another’s and one’s own life and makes up his/her own rules which go against the commandments given to us by God as the athlete Lance Armstrong did during many years. First, there is Dr. Faustus, a very famous and successful scholar. He is a smart man who knows everything about almost all sciences in the world, including philosophy, theology, law, and medicine. Yet, this knowledge is not enough for him. He is greedy and obsessive about it and the more he learns, the more he desires….

The Frankenstein & novel

The novel became the most famous work of Mary Shelley and since it was published, its popularity in the scholarly and lay audiences has been increasing among readers. This can be attributed to Mary Shelley’s ability to keep the story interesting through the narration of the story by Victor Frankenstein and the use of science fiction and horror in the story. This paper will explore how these elements/themes have been used in the novel to keep the story interesting and intriguing. Discussion The fact that the author uses Victor Frankenstein who is the victim of the monster’s horrific actions makes the story very interesting and easy for the reader to follow the events that unfold in the story. Shelley allows…

Frankenstein

Throughout the novel, Frankenstein, a feminist theme subtly pervades the novel, and is crucial to the characters of the story, the plot line and the setting of the novel. The reasons for the creation of the monster lie within Frankenstein’s own familial relationships, especially with the grief he experienced at the loss of his mother. Frankenstein is riddled with passive female characters who suffer throughout the novel. However, not one female character throughout the novel ever exhibits behaviour outside of the submissive female role. Elizabeth, Victor’s love, dies at the hand of the male creature, while waiting for Victor to rescue her. Elizabeth is unable to do anything to defend herself without the help of a man. Equally, Justine Moritz…

Frankenstein: Born Evil or Socially Corrupted

Was the Being Frankenstein created born evil or was he shaped into being evil? Or any man for that matter? Nobody is born evil. They are taught evil ways. They are corrupted by society. In the book Frankenstein, the Being created is looked at as a symbol of evil who only seeks to destroy everything in his path. However, the Being was corrupted by the initial rejection of his creator. It is true that man could be considered evil, but I believe that man is born good and simply put, corrupted by the evil that already exists in the world. As in Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein creates a being that he later turns away from due to its hideousness, but the…

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein there are a lot of examples of how she is warning the readers about the perils of modern science. One of the biggest examples is the creator of Frankenstein, and Frankenstein himself. The fact that someone was taking the role of “god”, and trying to create life is a very scary factor in life. If someone of our kind can gain the power to create their own human life from machines, science, and electricity then they could have the ultimate power. Power is something that all human kind wants to achieve, but also fear. Power goes along with the perils of modern science, which Mary Shelley warns the readers about. Modern science is definitely something to…

Frankenstein

In “Frankenstein”, Mary Shelley exemplifies each woman as submissive and disposable. Three ideas that present Shelley’s point of view are that women are seen as possessions, female characters are used only to mirror the male characters, and that women in the novel are portrayed as the representative women of the time period. Female characters like Elizabeth, Justine, Margaret, Safie, and Agatha serve a specific purpose in the novel. The creation and planned destruction of the monster were surrounded by the actions of two main female characters, which strengthen the importance of their influence upon Victor Frankenstein. Frankenstein’s father first met Caroline Beaufort while she was taking care of her dying father “with the greatest tenderness”. She is first female encountered…

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is one of the most studied novels in the literary canon. The seemingly simple but highly complex story is set in Eighteenth century Europe, specifically in Geneva, the Swiss Alps, Ingolstadt, England and Scotland, and the northern ice (the Arctic). The major characters are Victor Frankenstein (the scientist), his creation (the monster), Robert Walton (narrator), Elizabeth Lavenza (Victor’s fiance and minor narrator), and Alphonse Frankenstein (Victor’s father and minor narrator). The plot of the story is that Victor is studying animation, and decides that since he is plagued by the sadness of death, that he will learn how to bring life to dead objects. In doing so, he creates a whole person from select parts of deceased…

Introspection Within Frankenstein by Mary Shelly

Introspection reveals something about a person to himself. In a literary work such as Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, Introspection reveals something about a person to themselves and the audience. Although the monster of Frankenstein killed he is still a good person because he shows compassion, friendliness, and through remorse for the bad things that he had done; much of this had been shown through introspection Also, the monster had no control of him when he committed murder, therefore he is good even though he committed murder. The monster shows that he is good and not evil by showing compassion. He shows this when the monster realized that the family of peasants were unhappy because of their poverty that the monster…