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Feudalism Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Feudal Systems

The Japanese and European feudal systems were very much alike yet different in their own ways. Japan’s feudal system was composed of peasants, samurais, daimyos, shoguns and emperors. Then there was the European feudal system. It was composed of serfs, knights, church officials, nobles, kings and queens. In Japan, there was an emperor. The emperor did not do much, he was more like a figure head and he did not make any laws. He was just there to represent the country. The shogun was the person who not only make and pass laws, but controlled finances and the daimyos. The daimyos were lords that controlled samurai, which were warrior protectors for wealthy land owners. Samurai followed a code of behavior…

The Rise and Fall of Feudalism

Feudalism, as a decentralized political system, flourished in Medieval Europe. In this essay, the main political and economic characteristics of Feudalism will be mentioned, while discussing the main historical factors to the rise and fall of feudalism. The rise of Feudalism was a direct result of insecurity that caused by several significant historical factors. At first, the collapse of Roman Empire that led to prolonged unrest and power struggles was essentially a reason for why Europe was divided into many small states. The frequent fights among those states made people suffered from violence and insecurity. Even though Charlemagne united those states and Europe lasted for a period time of peace, Holy Roman Empire eventually fall and was broken into three…

Leasership and Social Organization in Europe

In Europe, most of the area used one main social structure. This is represented in my first pyramid. As you can see the kings are the most powerful, next come the nobles, then the knights, and finally the peasants. The box that has the word “church” in it to the side means that they had as much power as the kings and nobles. This society was based on the feudal system. It was mainly constructed for one reason, which was security. It was possible for everyone to move higher up the ranks of the pyramid. This is what most people aspired to do. England had a different social structure than this. It was made up of nobility at the top,…

The System and Structure of Feudalism

What is civilization? Aristotle once said: “I know what it is but when I turn to write it down, it eludes me. ” Civilization (Lat. civis – a town dweller) – The term emerged during the Enlightenment (around the eighteenth century) when it referred to an achieved state which could be contrasted with barbarism. It refers to a society viewed in an advanced state of social development (e. g. , with complex legal and political and religious organizations); “the people slowly progressed from barbarism to civilization. Civilization describes a form of human organization (it covers a significant geographical area and lasts for a considerable period of time). Medieval and Renaissance Civilization (Western Europe – England; 5 – 17 centuries) Medieval…

Feudalism in Japan and W. Europe

At a time when their governments could not sustain a stable centralized power, Japan and Western Europe both adapted their governments to fit their needs and adopted the feudal system. Although, the reasons why these two areas turned to feudalism are different, both societies had many centuries of this similar type of government. European feudalism was influenced most likely by the fall of the Roman empire and Germanic tribes (and other external forces) who had tried to invade them. Japan, on the other hand, adopted the system to settle internal disputes in the country and to split up the land between the nobility; Japanese feudalism developed because of internal attacks by groups of uncontrolled armies and had a more military…

Feudalism in Japan and W. Europe

At a time when their governments could not sustain a stable centralized power, Japan and Western Europe both adapted their governments to fit their needs and adopted the feudal system. Although, the reasons why these two areas turned to feudalism are different, both societies had many centuries of this similar type of government. European feudalism was influenced most likely by the fall of the Roman empire and Germanic tribes (and other external forces) who had tried to invade them. Japan, on the other hand, adopted the system to settle internal disputes in the country and to split up the land between the nobility; Japanese feudalism developed because of internal attacks by groups of uncontrolled armies and had a more military…

German states in 1524-1526

Thesis: God’s will and royal oppression is what drove the peasants to rebel in the German states; with their numbers, the Holy Roman Empire’s authority was weakened, economy affected, and most of all society suffered chaos; the poor mans’ revolts proved to be effective against the weak government responses. The leaders of government were lead to believe that the peasants acted upon the will of God. (Document 1 Leonhard von Eck) The peasants themselves claimed that their reasons were behind God. They would serve the authority of God, but obviously they did not believe the upper class was acting very “holy” to them. They would listen as long as the lords would promise them release from serfdom as God would…

French Revolution of 1789: Social factors

Although social tensions within France certainly contributed to the revolutionary situation in August 1789 it was not the only contributing factor. Divisions and inequality between, as well as within, the Three Estates created an atmosphere of disharmony while the influence of the enlightenment and liberal ideas fueled the growing discontent of the Estates toward the government and Louis XVI. However, political factors, like the undermining of the Kings power as well as economic factors, such as the chaotic nature of the taxation system exacerbated the social tensions and combined created a revolutionary situation. The Ancien Regime was riddled with social inequalities and therefor-growing discontent. Out of a population of around 25 million the First and Second Estates, which consisted of…

Jacobean Reading of King Lear

King Lear was written around 1603-06. A contextualised political reading interprets King Lear as a drama that gives expression to crucial political and social issues of its time: the hierarchy of the Jacobean state, King James’ belief in his divine right to rule, and the political anxieties that characterised the end of Queen Elizabeth’s reign: fears of civil war and division of the kingdom triggered by growth of conflicting fractions and a threatening underclass. Like all writers, Shakespeare reflected the world he knew. The ancient Britain the pseudo-historical Lear lived in contained anachronistic references to aspects of Jacobean life, such as eel pies and toasted cheese. Kent calls Oswald a ‘base football player’, evoking the class assumptions of the times….

The Decline Of Feudalism

The decline of feudalism occurred in the late middle ages. Many different things such as the black plague, changes in warfare, and increasing power of nobility caused the decline of feudalism. One of the reasons that feudalism ended was the black plague. The black plague was a bacterial infection that passed throughout Europe killing many people. After it had died down it is estimated that over a quarter of Europe?s overall population was killed. This also weakened the bonds of feudalism because vassals were worried for there own health and forgot their responsibilities. Some people believe that military technology was the largest reason for the decline. For one the long bow is a trajectory arrow that has enough power to…

Economic and Political Changes During the Medieval Ages

Before becoming what it is today Europe went through a lot of changes. After the fall of Rome, Europe was in chaos. This is until Charlemagne helped to restore it, after his death though, Europe was back into chaos. Chaos ended in the High Middle Ages when Europe prospered politically and economically. In the Early Middle Ages, also known as the “Dark ages” which was after the fall of Rome which was caused because of lack of a centralized government, lack of trade, and lack of formal learning, there was a period of great disorder. Because of Europe’s many natural resources such as their seas which were great for fighting and farming, many Germanic tribes, Viking, and other people tried…

Feudalism in Today’s Society

When searching for information on feudalism it is difficult to find modern sources speaking of it in a positive connotation. Most seem to regard it as merely a necessary step to capitalism. However, there are many aspects of feudalism still present in our society. Our society’s modes of defense and organization, as well as the devices used to make our standard of living possible, can be traced back to the age of feudalism. The feudal system stemmed from the people’s need to defend themselves from their many enemies. The main reason that people were willing to become vassals and work for their lord was so that they could be protected by him (Tierney 162). In the same sense, people in…

Feudalism and Manorialism

Feudalism and manorialism were very linked. They go together step by step in the Middle Ages. Feudalism concerned the rights, power, and lifestyle of the military elite: manorialism involved the service and obligations of the peasant classes. Word feudalism was invented in the 17 century by Montesquieu and popularized it in The Spirit of the Laws (1748). In the late eighteenth century people said that feudalism is the privileges of the aristocratic nobility, privileges that provoked the wrath of the bourgeoisie ((McKay, A History of Western Society 259). Later Karl Marx adopted it to other meaning. He thought that feudalism was precapitalistic society. Now people think that feudalism was social and political system held together by bonds of kingship, homage,…

How did Charlemagne Build and Govern his Empire?

Charlemagne was one of the most successful rulers of his time period. How did he build and govern his empire the way he did? He used a combination of his personal charisma and intelligence, the feudal system, the Church, and war in order to create the greatest Empire since the time of the Romans. His dislike of corruption, and his power in battle all contributed to his success as Emperor. Charlemagne himself was the key to his own success. He himself was a charismatic man, with an incredible amount of vital energy, and a desire to do well. An example of this was that he studied a lot, and made “heroic efforts” to learn to write, according to Einhard, his…

Knights in Medieval Europe

Knights were the most advanced fighting unit of the Middle Ages. Developed mainly by Charles Martel, they were horsemen, armored and carrying swords. By definition, a Knight was a mounted warrior in the service of his liege-lord (Snell, “Defining the Knight”, Knight Life, Internet). He they would generally receive a fief in exchange for their services. But Knights also became important as a symbol of honor, nobility (in the moral sense of the word), and loyalty towards the sovereign. Who could become a Knight? They were often sons of nobles, but could also be mercenaries. The traditional Knights, those who fought for their Lord and for pride and King and Country etc. often despised the mercenary knights (MacDonald, 7), who…

Comparing Feudal System to Caste System

Both the Feudal and the Caste System stressed rankings in society and they each had a hierarchy. This however, was one of the many similarities and differences the two systems had. In the Caste system, people in each varna(social class) were born into his/her class and married within their own group. One could not move up the social ladder and one could only be one varna. In Feudalism, one could be a lord and a vassal at the same time one person could pledge allegiance to more than one lord at a time. Also, in the Caste system of India, the most important varna were the priests while in Feudalism, the king was at the top of the hierarchy. In…