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Federalism Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Federalism

Due to the immense power of our federal government, people often argue that it is too powerful and should be lessened. Since the 1990’s there has been an effort to shift power from the federal government to the states. States’ rights have been an issue since our country was first founded, and even now we can’t seem to please everyone’s requests at equal power. This country was founded with the attempt to separate the federal government and the state government, known as federalism. The goal of federalism is to divide the power of state and federal governments, protect the rights of the state (through the 10th amendment), prevent tyranny of the majority, and have a government that is close to…

Federalists and Anti-Federalists

Between the years of 1787 and 1788, a debate arose over the constitution in the state legislatures along with a debate raged in newspapers and pamphlets throughout America’s thirteen colonies following the Constitutional Convention. There were two sides of this debate that felt towards the constitution in a total opposite way as each other. These two sides were the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists. Federalists defended the constitution while Anti-Federalists opposed it. Most people that were a part of the Federalists were well educated and propertied class. Most of these people lived in settled areas along the seaboard. They believed that the Articles of Confederation were weak and ineffective and that national government needed to be strong in order to function….

Federalism in the American System

There is much mentioned about “states rights” in the political process, but while many have heard of the term, they may not exactly understand what states rights refers to. In order to understand the term states rights, one needs to understand the term federalism. From a clear understanding of what federalism actually is, one can draw a sharp conclusion as to what the relationship between the states and the federal government as well as the courts role in maintaining the separation of powers so that the states and the federal government do not encroach upon one another. Federalism refers to a “split government” where there will be clearly defined laws of the land on a federal level as well as…

Federalism In Canada

From a historical standpoint, the view of the Federalist has always been opposite to the existence of tyranny of the majority. James Madison the fourth president of the United States of America wrote the Federalist paper, with the aim of securing the democracy of the country by distributing equally the significant seats of power of the government to different minorities to maintain balance and prevent oppression and tyranny. Specifically, James Madison pointed out that unlimited and unrestricted democracy wherein a majority with a single interest has a potential to disregard minority rights for the sake of its aims. Among the government officials with participation in writing of the argument were chief justice at that time John Jay and cabinet member…

Why does procedural federalism remain in the U.S.A.?

As I read Kevin Smith’s State and Local Government, it has been stated there that Federalism needs more sweetening as a part of the new Constitution since many people fear that that this will become a tool for the centralization of political dictatorial  power, however, it still remains intact in the United States. Despite the fact that debates are becoming raging by the conspiracy, and Anti Federalist is present, the supporters for this federalism still finds it to be an unsupported seize for power. According to the essay of Katherine Barrett and Richard Greene, there is big power imbalance between state and local government and the temptation is for the more powerful partner to guard its authority jealously, however, states…

Federalism & Parliament.

Federalism is a political philosophy or a system of government where leadership of a state is divided between a central head and its sub-units. States with a federal form of government are split into different territories, each territories are then governed by the sub-units. Each unit can act independently of other units such that each territory may different laws governing them. The central government, on the other hand, act for the common good which grants substantial autonomy to each territory. As a result, territories are subject to their laws and those imposed by the central government. The United States of America is an example of a country with a federal form of government from which each state has its own…

The Evolution of Federalism

Federalism is the current type of government used in the United States. In this system of government, there is distribution of power between central authority or the national government and the local political units. The framers of the United States Constitution decided that a federalist government would work best for the country because it can lead to a stronger and unified government thereby giving focus to the needs of each state and the country as a whole. Every type of government is unique in its own way and each has its own pros and cons. The evolution of a federal type of government has both positive and negative effects. Aside from unifying the government, the local government’s independence results in…

Advantages and Disadvantages of Government Systems

Around the world, each country has their own way of running things and their own government system. In this essay I will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of 3 government systems; unitary, confederate, and federal. Although some government systems might have similarities with the others, they are all very different and have different problems. A unitary state is sovereign and governed as a single unit where the central government is supreme and any administrative divisions only have the power that the central government allows them to have. One advantage of the unitary form of government is it’s a small government with less people so less tax dollars are used to pay government workers and more tax dollars go to the…

Federal Government

To what extent did the Federalist administrations of George Washington and John Adams promote national unity and advance the authority of the federal government? George Washington and John Adams were the first two presidents of the United States. As they had just fought a civil war against their oppressive mother country, it was only fitting that they were federalists. Federalists believed in national unity and a strong central government. They knew that in order for the country to succeed, a strong central government was needed. As a result, their administrations were built around promotion of national unity and advancements of the authority of the federal government. However, there was a limit to what extent they were successful. In my opinion,…

Legalization of Marijuana Short Essay

The legalization of medical marijuana is a current policy issue that has caused much tension between the different levels of government, as well as between the state and local agencies. This public policy has caused much conflict because of the various aspects of it such as legalization for medical use, the decriminalization of marijuana; and the many discrepancies that it has between federal and state laws. Legalization of medical marijuana has many pros and cons that have been brought to light by many different branches of the government, however, the issue of federalism is extremely prevalent. The issue of legalizing medical marijuana was brought on because of the various medical and recreational benefits that it claims to offer, as well…

Policy-making in the Federal System

The U.S. government’s expansive role in public policy is caught in a swirl of conflicting cross-currents. On the one hand, popular expectations about government’s responsibility to solve problems often exceed the capacity of state and local authorities to respond effectively. On the other hand, policies developed at the national level may not sufficiently reflect the great diversity of interests across the U.S. to be effective at the local level. Moreover, the search for effective policy is further complicated by theoretical debates about the constitutional framework of federalism, e.g., what limits on national power can be derived from the Tenth Amendment? A policy area in the middle of these cross-currents is elementary and secondary education – a subject traditionally under local…

Reasons for Australian federation

What is federation?Federation is a form of government in which powers and functions are divided between a central government and a number of political subdivisions that have a significant degree of political autonomy. It was the unification of Australian colonies which formed the commonwealth of Australia on 1st January 1901. ForBy the 1890’s nearly 75% of the population had been born in Australia. This created growing Australian nationalism. By the 1880’s the telegraph linked all capital cities and the telephone linked Melbourne and Sydney. Railway lines, although different gauges, made transport quicker. This resulted in better communication between the cities. It made sense to have one Australian Navy, under a Federal Government, than each colony having its own way. Each…

Charles Beard – Framing the Constitution

Beard thought that the constitution was just a document written by the rich, whose only motive was protecting their wealth and property. Beard said that these rich men included landholders, creditors, merchants, public bondholders, and wealthy lawyers. He was able to show that many of the men at the Constitutional Conventions fell into one of those categories. He said that the reason the framers wanted to protect against majority rule, was so the majority could not overthrow the few rich men and take over. He then compared this to a small group of creditors protecting themselves against the masses that owed them money. This is also why the constitution had clauses limiting the states control over money lending and circulation….

Thomas Jefferson: Assess this statement (AP question)

Thomas Jefferson was elected president of the United States in 1801 representing the Democratic-Republican Party. During his inaugural address he declared “We are all Republicans; we are all Federalists.” Follow Federalist president John Adams, Jefferson says this because he wanted a smooth transition of powers. With this quote he promised his people that he would compromise, if necessary, for the sake of unity and he backed up his words with his domestic and foreign policies. During his first years as president, Jefferson really lived up to his word concerning his domestic policies. Jefferson decided to keep Hamilton’s National Bank and debt repayment plan even though he was completely against it. He lowered the national debt from 83 million to 57…

Reasons for Australian Federation

Question: Outline the main reasons for Federation. What was the main reason? Federation happened in 1901 when the six separate Australian colonies came together to form what is now the Commonwealth of Australia. It occurred for many reasons including: to unite the defence of Australia; to make uniform bank laws; taxes and tariffs resulting in better trade and communication between states; and to put the “White Australia Policy” into practise. Federation came about with the aid of many political leaders, federation lobby groups, many drafts of the constitution and the people of Australia, through a series of conventions held in different colonies. One of the key reasons for Federation was to unite Australia’s defence. Each individual state’s defence force was…

The benefits the colonies gained from federation

In January 1901, the six separate, self-governing colonies of Australia united in federation, consequently creating the continent- nation, the Commonwealth of Australia. A constitution was drawn up modelled similarly, upon the British and American constitutions. As an outcome of federation, the life of the separate states, and individual citizens shifted. Edmund Barton, the introductory prime minister of federal government supported the growth of the nation’s economy, and developed the creation of a fused defence system. In the following subsections, we will discuss the reasons for the states, desiring federation, and the benefits they obtained, in signing the historical Commonwealth of Australia Act in the June of 1900[Western Australia signed a month there after.] The birth of a new century, and…

Federalism, unitary and confedrate government

Federalism is a governmental organization in which authority is divided between two sovereign levels of government. ·National ·Regional Federalism is a method of government where decision on taxes and education are shared between two political powers and are exercised on two levels of government. There are several distinguishing deference’s between federalist, unitary, and confederation government structures. Federal states may be created in one of two ways · Separate political units may decide to join together in a political partnership. ·An existing unitary government may choose to disperse. In a federal system, each citizen is subject to two governments: the national or federal governments and the regional, state, or local government. The courts or some other impartial body is usually given…

Thomas Jefferson and James Madison’s views

The general consensus among historians is that there was a difference of opinions between Thomas Jefferson and James Madison on the policies of the interpretation of the Constitution. It is generally believed that Thomas Jefferson felt that there should be strict and inflexible interpretation of the Constitution, while James Madison felt that the Constitution was elastic and that many different laws could be derived form a single clause. Their views, however, seemed to have switched over the period of 1801-1817 to fit the needs of the time, and so those beliefs were not really set in stone. In the year 1800, Thomas Jefferson viewed the Constitution as a document that should be interpreted very strictly. He felt that the country…

Nationalism After the War of 1812

After the war of 1812, a surge of nationalism spread everywhere throughout America. Having unofficially won the war without even an official army, the people of America became very proud of themselves and how their great country established such a feat. The nationalism grew until John Marshall, an aggressive Chief Justice, further strengthened and expanded it. He was a devout Federalist appointed by John Adams years before his most famous case of Marbury vs. Madison in 1803. Being a Federalist he was a great rival to Thomas Jefferson. He served until 1835 and was the forth Supreme Court Justice. His only legal schooling was six weeks attending lectures at the College of William and Mary, however when he took the…

Evolution: Federalists to Whigs

America’s early history is marked with drastic changes in political situations and public opinions, leading to the inception and termination of various political parties. These parties came and went, but at any single moment in time, America’s government was controlled by one party, with a second vying for power. One such party was born out of the controversy over the adoption of the proposed Federal Constitution – the Federalist Party. It dominated congress and, therefore, America for approximately twenty-five years until it disintegrated and its members scattered throughout various other factions. Fourteen years after the Federalists’ dissolution the Whig party rose as another prominent political group. The Whig party, although historically considered absolutely independent of any other previous American parties,…

Federal Government of the United States

Introduction In the American political system Federalism is a basic Structural feature that has mostly generated a great deal of conflict throughout political history America. It involves the governments multiple layers with shared powers amongst them and the unique powers to varieties of the levels of the government (Wood Gordon, 1995). The most three important levels of American federalism are the federal or national government, the states, and the local governments (cities, counties, townships). In the world most of the political systems are unitary systems, but in the system of American it is system of divided government (Wood Gordon, 1995). In the history American Federalism it has evolved over the course. In the time at different points, the boundaries and…

Advantages and Disadvantages of the Articles of Confederation

From their landing in the New World in the early 1600s, the British subjects, or colonists, were under the rule of the British King. Some colonies had more power with their own legislatures, but the British King and/or Parliament always had the final rule. Some of the British Kings tended to be more lenient than others, but when the Restoration occurred in 1660, Charles II was restored to power in England and he planned on ruling with a complete monarchy. This would cause further conflict between the colonies and England and eventually in the 1700s, a Revolution. Through this revolution, since the colonies weren’t going to be ruled by England, a new, central government had to be drawn up. This…

Unitary and federal systems

There are two systems of government, the unitary and the federal states, which are divided according to the organization of government, depending on how the power between different types of governments (federal and the state) is shared. Unitary system is one where control is focused in the hands of the one central force. Also there is the presence of local government which makes some rules and regulations but most administrative guidance belongs to the capital city. Unitary countries have a single constitution and the laws are established for the whole county. Federal system differs from the unitary. The power is divided among national government and provinces. These smaller parts of the country have the right to have its own constitution,…

To Ratify or Not to Ratify

1. According to Article VII, the Constitution would go into effect when nine states ratified it. A fierce debate raged for months between the Federalists, who supported the Constitution, and the Anti-Federalists, who opposed it. What arguments did each group present? Fill in the chart below with a brief description of the main arguments. Federalist arguments Anti-Federalists arguments The debate reached meeting halls, homes, and newspapers. Throughout the states, many newspapers where published by Maddison, Hamilton, and Jay- they produced a remarkable series of 85 political editorials aimed at winning support for the new Constitution. Anti-federalists worried that a strong, central government would override the public good and impose tranny on the people. Madison, Hamilton, and Jay argued that the…

10th Amendment

The purpose of the 10th Amendment is to draw a line between the federal and state government’s powers. This amendment also protects their powers from each other. This amendment has been used to define the federal government’s power to tax, law enforcement and federal regulations. At one point in time this amendment was easily interpreted if it’s not included in the constitution, the federal government cannot give it to the states. Over the years federal power was expanded through cases in the Supreme Court. When the founding fathers wrote the Constitution, they encompassed the 10th amendment, which says “The powers delegated to the United States by the constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states…

Cohesion and division in Australia during World War 2

Unlike the First World War which caused large social divisions within society over conflicting issues, Australia’s involvement in the Second World War served to create a sense of cohesion rather than division. There was a sense of national unity to provide support for Britain at the beginning of the war and as the threat of a Japanese invasion increased, so did this sense of unity. However as the war progressed, Australia became more independent from Britain and was prepared to act in its own interests to protect Australia. The general sense of cohesion was challenged by divisive elements such as the treatment of aliens, increase in federal power and the presence of the United States and Americans in Australia. However…

Employment Law and Compliance Plan

Atwood and Allen Consulting Bradley Stonefield Limousine Service Recruitment and Selection Strategies Recommendations Atwood and Allen Consulting Bradley Stonefield Limousine Service Recruitment and Selection Strategies Recommendations The Bradley Stonefield Limousine Service Company has been established to providetransportation to public. The first step is recruitment and selection of prospective new employees that will organize and man the business. The Human Resource Department must explore resources to find right candidates. Recruitment and selection team must addressing the job responsibilities and scope of work of each new position. The staffing process is normally divided into recruitment phase and the selection phase. Recruitment is the searching and attracting of job seekers and the selection is the part job seekers are chosen to get the…

Hamilton vs Jefferson

Hamilton and Jefferson disagreed on pretty much everything; this was easily portrayed in their movements during the early stages of development in America. They had different political philosophies, views on long-term economic outlooks, interpretations of the Constitution, and mindsets on federal versus state power. These discrepancies, however, would eventually help in creating a more balanced government in America. In terms of political philosophies, Alexander Hamilton had a completely different view form Thomas Jefferson. Hamilton believed that the common people of America often acted foolishly, while Jefferson had a lot of faith in common people such as farmers. Also, Hamilton thought that it was right for only the rich, educated and wellborn to rule. Another difference in the political ideologies between…

Dual Federalism

This is a state of government where power is shared between the federal and the state governments. In dual federalism, both the national and the state governments hold sovereign power in their respective areas of authority. The separation of power, resources, and programs is clearly defined. Dual federalism is normally compared to a layer cake whereby the levels of powers do not overlap each other. In this case, no level should interfere with the powers of the other. That is why it is referred to as the exercise of concurrent power. That gives every level of government supremacy in their area of authority. This paper looks at the historical definition of dual federalism and how it has changed over the…

About the United States Constitution

Essay 1 The Constitution of the United States created the form of government known as federalism. The national and state governments each have specific powers and functions, while also sharing some of the same powers. The Constitution made the agreement that any laws passed under the constitution would be the supreme law of the land. Three separate branches were created; the legislative, executive, and judicial. **********The new Constitution resolved the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation to the extent that it created a new system of government that was equipped with the necessary powers needed to implement changes through compromises, the passing of laws, and the levying of taxes. During the Constitutional Convention of 1787, delegates met in Philadelphia to…