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Eugene Nida Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Translation Shift Approaches

Introduction The term “shift” commonly refers to changes which occur or may occur in the process of translating. As long as translating is a language use, the notion of shift belongs to the notion of linguistic performance as opposed to that of theories of competence. Although the term “shift” was initially adopted by Catford as “departures from formal correspondence in the process of from the Source Text (ST) to the Target Text (TT), other scholars like Levy, Popovic, Blum-Kulka, Hatim, M. Shlesinger, and Van Leuven-Zwart also attempted to produce and apply a model of “shift analysis”. In this paper, we are going to scrutinize into the topic of shift by giving a detailed account of the theories and discussions on…

Equivalence in Translation

Introduction Dynamic equivalence, as a respectable principle of translation, has been around in the translation sector for a long time. It is the method whereby the translator’s purpose is not to give a literal, word-for-word rendition but to transfer the meaning of the text as would be best expressed in the words of the receptor (native) language. In this paper, we will focus on the criteria necessary to qualify dynamic equivalence with special reference to Eugene Nida, as well as distinctive viewpoints from famous translation theorists. Also, we will talk about the formal equivalence and structural equivalence. Finally, we will have the criticism of dynamic equivalence. Eugene A. Nida and ‘Dynamic Equivalence’ Eugene A. Nida has the deep conviction justified…

Equivalence in Translation

Professionally, however, the term translation is | |confined to the written, and the term interpretation to the spoken (Newmark, 1991: 35). If confined to a written language, translation is a | |cover term with three distinguishable meanings: 1) translating, the process (to translate; the activity rather than the tangible object), 2)| |a translation: the product of the process of translating (e. g. the translated text), and 3) translation: the abstract concept which | |encompasses both the process of translating and the product of that process Bell (1991: 13). The term ‘translation’ used and discussed | |throughout this paper is confined to the written language, and refers to both the product and process of translating. | | | |The definitions of…

Translation Procedures

Constant reevaluation of the attempt made; contrasting it with the existing available translations of the same text done by other translators Constant reevaluation of the attempt made; contrasting it with the existing available translations of the same text done by other translators Procedures of translating culture-specific concepts (CSCs) (Graedler) Procedures of translating culture-specific concepts (CSCs) (Graedler) 1. Making up a new word. 2. Explaining the meaning of the SL expression in lieu of translating it. 3. Making up a new word. 4. Explaining the meaning of the SL expression in lieu of translating it. 5. Preserving the SL term intact. 6. Opting for a word in the TL which seems similar to or has the same “relevance” as the SL…

Dynamic and formal equivalence

Translation is the communication of the meaning of a source-language text by means of an equivalent target-language text. Semantic Translation: Semantic translation takes advantage of semantics that associate meaning with individual data elements in one dictionary to create an equivalent meaning in a second system. Literal Translation: Literal translation, or directed translation, is the rendering of text from one language to another “word-for-word” (Latin: “verbum pro verbo”) with or without conveying the sense of the original. Functional Translation: Functional approach to translation values the context and desist from treating language merely as a code. Official translation: A complete and accurate translation into English from the issuing language. DYNAMIC EQUIVALENCE: Dynamic equivalence (or functional equivalence) conveys the essential thoughts expressed in…