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Developmental Delays Essay

1 in every 6 U.S. children are diagnosed with a developmental disability, according to a new Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention study published online in the journal Pediatrics Monday. The represents an increase of 17% between 1997 and 2008 alone. Child development refers to the process in which children go through changes in skill development during predictable time periods, called developmental milestones. Developmental delay occurs when children have no reached these milestones by the expected time period. For example, if the normal range for learning to walk is between 9 and 15 months, and a 20-month-old child has still not begun walking, this would be considered a developmental delay. Developmental delays can occur in all five areas of development or may just happen in one or more of those areas. Also the growth in each area of development is related to growth I the other areas. So if there is a difficulty in one area, such as speech and language, it is likely to influence development in other areas like social and emotional. Children are placed at genetic risk by being born with a genetic or chromosomal abnormality. A good example of genetic risk is Down syndrome, a disorder that causes developmental delay because of an abnormal chromosome. Environmental risk results from exposure to harmful agents either before or after birth, and can include things like poor maternal nutrition or exposure to toxins like lead or drugs or infections that are passed form a mother to her baby during pregnancy. Environmental risk also includes a child’s life experiences. For example, children who are born prematurely face severe poverty, mother’s depression, poor nutrition, or lack of care and are at increased risk for developmental delays. Risk factors have a cumulative impact upon development. As the number of risk factors increases, a child is put at greater risk for developmental delay. There are several general “warning signs” of possible delay. These include:

* Behavioral
* Does not pay attention or stay focused on an activity for as long a time as other children of the same age * Focuses on unusual objects for long periods of time; enjoys this more than interacting with others * Avoids or rarely makes eye contact with others

* Gets unusually frustrated when trying to do simple tasks that most children of the same age can do * Shows aggressive behaviors and acting out and appears to be very stubborn compared with other children * Displays violent behaviors on a daily basis

* Stares into space, rocks body, or talks to self more often than other children of the same age * Does not seek love and approval from caregiver or parent * Gross motor
* Has stiff arms and/or legs
* Has a floppy or limp body posture compared to other children of the same age * Uses on side of body more than the other
* Has a very clumsy manner compared with other children of the same age In addition, because children usually acquire developmental milestones or skills during a specific time frame or “window”, we can predict when most children will learn different skills. In the world today there are many programs for children who are experiencing developmental delays.

These programs help the children catch up if it is possible and improve the skills they have. Examples of such programs include: * IEP (individualized education plan)
* Early intervention services
* IFSP (individualized family service plan

According to the CDC the percentages of U.S. children in the age group of 3-17 years of age, 1997-2008 are as follows: * Any developmental disability
* 13.87%
* Learning disability
* 7.66%
* ADHD
* 6.69%
In conclusion I would say there are a lot more options today for children with developmental delays then there were years ago. We are making progress in helping our special needs children and this will continue to help them improve the quality of life that these children have in their future. I
also believe that all children develop at a slightly different pace and some of the more recent diagnosis might be to quick to hand out. I am a parent of 2 special needs children one mild and one more severe so I can relate to this subject more and have a bias opinion on both sides of the discussion.

1 in every 6 U.S. children are diagnosed with a developmental disability, according to a new Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention study published online in the journal Pediatrics Monday. The represents an increase of 17% between 1997 and 2008 alone. Child development refers to the process in which children go through changes in skill development during predictable time periods, called developmental milestones. Developmental delay occurs when children have no reached these milestones by the expected time period. For example, if the normal range for learning to walk is between 9 and 15 months, and a 20-month-old child has still not begun walking, this would be considered a developmental delay. Developmental delays can occur in all five areas of development or may just happen in one or more of those areas. Also the growth in each area of development is related to growth I the other areas. So if there is a difficulty in one area, such as speech and language, it is likely to influence development in other areas like social and emotional. Children are placed at genetic risk by being born with a genetic or chromosomal abnormality. A good example of genetic risk is Down syndrome, a disorder that causes developmental delay because of an abnormal chromosome. Environmental risk results from exposure to harmful agents either before or after birth, and can include things like poor maternal nutrition or exposure to toxins like lead or drugs or infections that are passed form a mother to her baby during pregnancy. Environmental risk also includes a child’s life experiences. For example, children who are born prematurely face severe poverty, mother’s depression, poor nutrition, or lack of care and are at increased risk for developmental delays. Risk factors have a cumulative impact upon development. As the number of risk factors increases, a child is put at greater risk for developmental delay. There are several general “warning signs” of possible delay. These include:

* Behavioral
* Does not pay attention or stay focused on an activity for as long a time as other children of the same age * Focuses on unusual objects for long periods of time; enjoys this more than interacting with others * Avoids or rarely makes eye contact with others

* Gets unusually frustrated when trying to do simple tasks that most children of the same age can do * Shows aggressive behaviors and acting out and appears to be very stubborn compared with other children * Displays violent behaviors on a daily basis

* Stares into space, rocks body, or talks to self more often than other children of the same age * Does not seek love and approval from caregiver or parent * Gross motor
* Has stiff arms and/or legs
* Has a floppy or limp body posture compared to other children of the same age * Uses on side of body more than the other
* Has a very clumsy manner compared with other children of the same age In addition, because children usually acquire developmental milestones or skills during a specific time frame or “window”, we can predict when most children will learn different skills. In the world today there are many programs for children who are experiencing developmental delays.

These programs help the children catch up if it is possible and improve the skills they have. Examples of such programs include: * IEP (individualized education plan)
* Early intervention services
* IFSP (individualized family service plan

According to the CDC the percentages of U.S. children in the age group of 3-17 years of age, 1997-2008 are as follows: * Any developmental disability
* 13.87%
* Learning disability
* 7.66%
* ADHD
* 6.69%
In conclusion I would say there are a lot more options today for children with developmental delays then there were years ago. We are making progress in helping our special needs children and this will continue to help them improve the quality of life that these children have in their future. I
also believe that all children develop at a slightly different pace and some of the more recent diagnosis might be to quick to hand out. I am a parent of 2 special needs children one mild and one more severe so I can relate to this subject more and have a bias opinion on both sides of the discussion.


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