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Course Syllabi- History of Graphic Design Essay

Course
Description

History of Graphic Design is a critical contextual research and survey study of the intents, influences, practices, and artifacts of graphic design. The course will be structured on readings, research, and visual presentations on subjects of designer activities throughout history with an emphasis on the broader historical context of the planning, production, form, distribution, reception and cultural integration of graphic design

Student
Handbook

The Student Handbook is now available digitally rather than in hard copy. It can be found on the PNCA website (under Student Life) and on Homeroom (Home page, under PNCA Essentials).

Disability
Support

PNCA is in compliance with federal law requiring colleges to provide reasonable accommodations for students with documented physical and/or learning disabilities. If you have a disability that might affect your
performance in this class, please make it known to the instructor.

Learning
Outcomes

At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to : -­‐ Demonstrate and articulate in discussions, writings, and visual presentations an understanding of the historical context of the creation of a work of graphic design (i.e. – time, place, culture, intents)

-­‐

Synthesize readings and lectures and be able to formulate and post discussion points and prepare visual examples for peer review and feedback (as comments) using online tools

-­‐

Utilize, and bibliographically document, a range of resources used for the study of the history of graphic design (books, journals, periodicals, online, interviews)

-­‐

Creative Practice

Identify the roles, activities, and trades of communication design professionals throughout history and distinguish specific fields related to and integrated with the profession of graphic design

-­‐

Learning Outcomes are
linked to PNCA’s Core
Values which are:

Identify and articulate the influence of fine art (theories, trends, aesthetics, visual styles) on the work of graphic designers

Integrated Knowledge,
Critical Thinking, & Cultural
Inquiry
Social and Ethical

Responsibility

Course
Content

initiate, and participate in, discussion on the planning, process, production and distribution of works of graphic design

-­‐

Effective
Communication

-­‐

formulate a connection of the cultural influences on design from history with practices of contemporary graphic designers through examples, writings, and discussions

Assignments for this Class:
-­‐
-­‐
-­‐
-­‐

Required Readings and discussion with evidence of comprehension Weekly Subject Research and On-line Posting to Homeroom
Weekly In-Class presentations
Final Research Paper

Topics for weekly research will include:
Design during Cultural Upheavals / World Conflicts
Design for Social Causes / Design for Social Good
Design for Commerce, Consumption, Commercialism
Information Design / Dissemination and Distribution of Information Technological Changes and its Influence on Graphic Design
Design as Author, Designer as Artist, Whole Designer
The Concept of Brand and the Development of Brand Identity
Low Design / Bad Design
Major Benchmarks in Typography
Reactionary Design / Culture Jamming

Expectations/Policies for this course:
Students are required to read and to be ready to articulate a response to all readings assigned in class. Each week there will be an assigned subject research topic that will require independent sourcing, image documentation, writing, and on-line posting on the ‘Homeroom’ site established for the course. Each student will make a 5-10 minute presentation of each assignment postings during classtime with an expectation of the use of prepared supported notes for verbal elaboration on the material presented. In-class and on-line participation in the form of response and discussion and will be expected and recorded. A final research project on the relatedness of the topics of historical practice presented to the practices of a contemporary designer or design firm/group will be in the form of a research paper. (8-10 pages minimum)

Attendance
You will be allowed two absences without additional penalty – although you are responsible for any work that is missed. The third absence will result in the lowering of an entire letter grade from the computed final grade. A fourth absence will result in a final failing grade of F. Missing 30 minutes of a class period (during any part of the scheduled classtime) counts as an absence. Frequent tardiness (less than 15 minutes) will accumulate to absences (3 tardies =1 absence)

Number of hours students are expected to work outside of class: This class meets for three hours per week, and six hours of work outside of class are expected. (3 credits)

Grading
Criteria

• Weekly Research Assignments timely completion / in-class presentation preparedness and comprehensiveness
• In-Class participation/contributions
• On-Line participation/contributions
• Final Research Paper

Materials /
Supplies

Required:
• Access to, or ownership of, equipment to scan/photograph (digitize), upload and review visual and text information on a regular daily basis. (Computer and Camera/Scanner)
• Money for photocopying (approx. $20 projected)
• Flash Drive (2-4gb)

Recommended: History of Graphic Design text purchases (Personal library)

Bibliography
The books listed here are
predominantly larger
volumes dedicated to a
broad overview and
history of graphic
design. (More may be
added during the
semester) Many less
comprehensive but key
texts are available in the
library as well as journals
and periodicals that are
specific to designers,
styles, and various other
edited groupings – these
should be sought out
and reviewed andutilized
especially for more indepth study on a
research subject.

Major Texts of the History of Graphic Design
Those mark with asterisk* are on reserve shelf at front desk of PNCA library and are available on 3 hr. check out (note: many of these text have duplicates or earlier editions and are available for longer check out periods if needed) Title: Meggs, History of Graphic Design, 4th Edition*

Author(s): Philip Meggs, Alston Purvis
Publisher: Wiley
ISBN: 978047169902
Library Call#: Z 246 .M43 1983
Title: Graphic Design, a Concise History*
Author: Richard Hollis
Publisher: Thames & Hudson world of art
ISBN 0500203474
Library Call#: NC 998 .H65 1994
Title: Graphic Design: a New History* (1st and 2nd Editions) Author: Stephen Eskilson
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300120117
Library Call#: NC 998 .E85 2007 (1st Edition in Library*)

Students are invited to
contribute to the
additions to this
bibliography through
their weekly research
and presentation.
All sources should be
cited using MLA citation
methods.

Title: Graphic Design History, A Critical Guide*
Author(s): Johanna Drucker, Emily McVarish
Publisher: Pearson/Prentice Hall
ISBN: 0132410753
Library Call#: NC 998 .D78 2009
Title: Graphic Design in America*
Author(s): Mildred Friedman, Joseph Giovannini, Steven Heller Publisher: Walker Art Center
ISBN: 0810910365
Library Call#: NC 998.5 .A1 G65
Title: Design, Writing, Research*
Author(s): Ellen Lupton, Abbot Miller
Publisher: Kiosk
ISBN: 1568980477
Library Call#: Z 246 .L86 1996
Title: Communication Design, Principles, Methods, and Practice Author: Jorge Frascara
Publisher: Allworth Press
ISBN: 1581153651

Title: A Century of Graphic Design
Author: Jeremy Aynsley
Publisher: Barron’s Educational Series
ISBN: 0764153242
Library Call#: NC 998.4 .A96 2001

Other Readings:
Journal: Visible Language 28.3, New Perspectives, Critical Histories of Graphic Design, Pt. 1 Critiques
Editor and Publisher: Sharon Poggenpohl

Digital reference (Links)
sites should be added to
online postings

On-Line History of Graphic Design Reference
www.designhistory.org

Weekly
Course
Schedule

Week 1 6 Sept

Week 2 13 Sept
Friday, 13 September
is the last day to add
or drop a class.

All information (dates, times and assignments) in this schedule is subject to change at any point during the semester. Updates will be announced and posted.

Welcome / Introductions
Class Expectations / Syllabus Overview / Course Structure / Assignments Using Homeroom / Communication Expectations
Course Resources
Reading Assigned (Posted on Homeroom)

Critical Histories of Graphic Design
Discussion of Readings on the approaches to History of Graphic Design development Lecture: Brief History of Graphic Design, Pt.1
Read on Homeroom these posted excerpts for this class: Graphic Design History, a critical guide, by Drucker and McVarish, Communication Design, Principles, Methods, and Practice, by Frascara, Graphic Design, a Concise History, by Hollis, Megg’s History of Graphic Design, by Meggs and Purvis, Visible Language 28.3 New Perspectives: Critical Histories of Graphic Design, article by Blauvelt

Also read (for this classes visual lecture): “Prehistoric Prelude to Graphic Design” from Graphic Design History, a Critical Guide, by Drucker and McVarish

Week 3 20 Sept

Lecture: Brief History of Graphic Design, Pt.2
Read on Homeroom these posted excerpts for this class: “Early Writing: Mark Making, Notations Systems, and Scripts” from Graphic Design History, a Critical Guide, by Drucker and McVarish
Lecture: Conventions and Norms
Overview of Weekly Research Project Topics, Objectives, Goals, Expectations, Methods Introduction of Topic 1: Design during Cultural Upheavals / World Conflict

Week 4 27 Sept

Student Research Presentations of Topic 1: Design during Cultural Upheavals / World Conflict
Questions and Discussion
Introduction of Topic 2: Design for Social Causes / Design for Social Good

Week 5 4 Oct

Student Research Presentations of Topic 2: Design for Social Causes / Design for Social Good
Questions and Discussion
Introduction of Topic 3: Design for Commerce, Consumption, Commercialism

Week 6 11 Oct

Student Presentations of Topic 3: Design for Commerce, Consumption, Commercialism Questions and Discussion
Introduction of Topic 4: Information Design / Dissemination and Distribution of Information

Week 7 18 Oct

Student Presentations of Topic 4: Information Design / Dissemination and Distribution of Information
Questions and Discussion
Introduction of Topic 5: Technological Changes and its Influence on Graphic Design

Week 8 25 Oct

Student Presentations of Topic 5: Technological Changes and its Influence on Graphic Design
Questions and Discussion
Introduction of Topic 6: Design as Author, Designer as Artist, Whole Designer

Friday, 25 October is
the last day to
withdraw from a class.

Week 9 1 Nov

Student Presentations of Topic 6: Design as Author, Designer as Artist, Whole Designer Questions and Discussion
Introduction of Topic 7: The Concept of Brand and the Development of Brand Identity

Week 10 8 Nov

Student Presentations of Topic 7: The Concept of Brand and the Development of Brand Identity
Questions and Discussion
Introduction of Topic 8: Low Design / Bad Design

Week 11 15 Nov Student Presentations of Topic 8: Low Design / Bad Design Questions and Discussion
Introduction of Topic 9: Major Benchmarks in Typography

Week 12 22 Nov Student Presentations of Topic 9: Low Design / Bad Design Monday, 18
November SP14
registration begins

Questions and Discussion
Introduction of Topic 10: Reactionary Design / Culture Jamming

Week 13 29 Nov Thanksgiving Holiday. No class.

Week 14 6 Dec

Student Presentations of Topic 10: Reactionary Design / Culture Jamming Questions and Discussion
Final Paper – Topic Determination

Week 15 13 Dec

Final Paper Draft Due – Individual Meetings

Week 16 20 Dec

Final Class – Course Wrap-up / Overview

Friday, 20 December
Last day of classes.

Please note: The rest of the template is uniform for all PNCA classes, it includes: PNCA grading policy, statement on plagiarism, library & ACE. This section should be included in any electronic versions of the syllabus, but doesn’t need to be distributed to students in paper form.

ACE

The Academic Center for Excellence (ACE) @PNCA is a peer driven support network for students at all levels. ACE provides in person and online assistance with the following: study skills, digital tools, research, writing and editing strategies, math, professional practices (résumés, cover letters, documentation), idea generation, project management, organization, and more. For more information, location and hours, please visit the ACE Homeroom site: http://homeroom.pnca.edu/sites/1019

About Your
Library

The Charles Voorhies Fine Art Library provides research assistance, help with citations and bibliographies and a place to document your artwork. Whether you are looking for articles, books, audio collections, DVDs, or Web resources, the library can help! For research help contact Dan McClure ([email protected]) and for help with library materials contact Serenity Ibsen ([email protected]). More information is available at
www.library.pnca.edu.

Statement
on Academic
Integrity

PNCA values intellectual honesty and encourages authentic expression, independent thinking and original writing. The College expects that all work conducted and submitted by our students shall be the combined result of original thought and ethical research. All acts of plagiarism, whether deliberate or unintentional, are considered a violation of the Student Code of Conduct and will not be tolerated on the PNCA campus. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of and to act in accordance with the PNCA Guidelines for Academic Honesty. This is a document that defines plagiarism, discusses the conventions of ethical research and documentation, and explains the appropriate uses of source materials. These guidelines also describe the student’s responsibility for maintaining documentation and evidence of research in order to verify originality in all writing assignments at PNCA. The document: PNCA Guidelines for Academic Honesty is provided for you in the following locations on campus: the Student Handbook, the Library’s Homeroom site, the Academic Integrity HomeRoom site, the ACE HomeRoom site, the Foundation HomeRoom site, the Liberal Arts Homeroom site. You may also view written copies of the PNCA Guidelines for Academic Honesty in the office of Student Services, the Academic Dean’s office, and the PNCA Library.

Student
Information +
Responsibilities

Students are expected to have in their possession a current edition of the Student Handbook. Students are responsible for all the information contained in the handbook, and should refer to the handbook frequently for deadlines, policies, procedures, and

responsibilities. Student Handbooks are available in the office of Student Services. Students are expected to check their student mailboxes frequently for communications from their instructors or from the administrative offices of the college. Week Two is the last week that you may add or drop a class with no penalty. Week Eight is the last week that you may withdraw from a class with a “W.”

PNCA
Grading
Criteria
This is the
institutional grading
policy for all PNCA
students.

Grades are distributed after the end of each semester.
Grading Criteria
Grade A: Student performance is outstanding. Student exhibits excellent achievement and craftsmanship in all aspects of work. Student exceeds the problem criteria and consistently challenges himself/herself to seek fresh solutions to assigned problems. Student exhibits a commitment to expanding ideas, vocabulary and performance. Student’s attendance, participation and class involvement are excellent. Grade B: Student performs beyond requirements of assignments. Student exhibits above-average progress and craftsmanship in all work. Student meets and exceeds the problem criteria. Student exhibits above-average interest in expanding ideas, vocabulary and performance. Student’s attendance, participation and class involvement are above average.

Grade C: Student performance is average and all requirements are fulfilled. Student exhibits an average level of progress and improvement in all work. Student meets the problem criteria. Student exhibits interest in expanding ideas, vocabulary and performance. Student’s attendance, participation and class involvement are adequate. Grade D: Student performance is uneven and requirements are partially fulfilled. Student’s output is minimal. Student
exhibits minimal improvement in work. Student does not meet the problem criteria in all assignments. Student exhibits minimal interest in expanding ideas, vocabulary and performance. Student’s attendance, participation and class involvement are less than adequate.

Grade F: No credit earned. Student fails to meet a minimum performance level. Student does not exhibit achievement, progress or adequate levels of craftsmanship in all assignments. Student’s work is consistently incomplete or unsuccessful. Student’s attendance, participation and class involvement are inadequate. Pass/Fail Grade: A Pass/Fail grade will be given for designated courses in which the course content is such that direct faculty oversight of the learning experience is not possible, and evaluation on the present grading scale would be difficult. “Pass” implies a “C” grade or above. “Fail” implies less than a “C” grade and course work graded as “Fail” does not apply to the degree. Pass/Fail grades are not calculated in the grade point average. This grading applies to Internships. Graphic Design Co-op uses traditional letter grades. Incompletes

In certain situations, a student may request an “Incomplete” grade in a class. You may petition for an “Incomplete” only if your situation meets both of these conditions:
1. An extenuating circumstance exists and it has prevented you from completing the coursework (Extenuating circumstances are illnesses, family, emergencies, etc.),
2. You are currently in good standing in the class.
See the Student Handbook for more information about Grades and Incompletes.


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