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Conflict in the Most Dangerous Game Essay

Have you ever wondered how authors create or compose conflict into their stories? An author uses a method or way of developing conflict into the story using plots. Most stories follow a plot to construct the unique events of the story. Conflicts are very important in a story to help make the story more interesting and entertaining in itʼs own way.

Authors use conflicts in all genres of writing and storytelling. When authors write a story with a conflict they usually build upon the story with some smaller problems called rising conflicts. They use these small encounters or problems to help amp up the story and make it more interesting. In some genres of writing the rising conflicts help the reader to understand and predict what will happen in the main conflict of the story. They hint and tease the reader into thinking what will happen by making that environment with the rising encounters. When the main conflict hits in most stories it feels like a slap in the face because you most likely had no idea what was going to happen. The conflict is supposed to surprise the reader and change the story completely.

Once the conflict hits its over very soon and often there is no looking back. Thats one of the reasons that writers chose to include conflict in their stories. In “The Most Dangerous Game” , Richard Connell provides one way of rising conflict called; Human vs Nature. This form of rising conflict shows a struggle between the character and the situation the character is put into. When Rainsford fell off of the yacht, and stumbled onto sand, that was a example of Human Vs. Nature in the story. Next, after the conflict the story will take one of two paths, it could suddenly end, but it could continue on into the story using falling conflicts.

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