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Chinua Achebe Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Okonkwo Character

In his novel, Chinua Achebe takes the reader to the world of the Igbo tribe during the pre-imperialism Victorian era. Okonkwo, the main character, was a highly respected member of the Igbo tribe. He is the caretaker of a child, but with a stroke of irony, ends up killing him. After an accident, he and his family are forced into exile. By the time he returns, the Igbo tribe has undergone many changes. He finds these changes to his life and culture to be overwhelming, and thus takes his own life. Throughout the novel, Okonkwo’s words demonstrate his inner conflicts, his troubled past with his family, and his superiority complex. Okonkwo is a very conflicted individual because, throughout the novel…

Things Fall Apart Essay on Traditions and Beliefs

There are a lot of reasons why traditions and beliefs play a part in everyone’s life. There is a large roll for them in the book “Things Fall Apart” by Chinua Achebe. The rolls of the traditions and beliefs can decide the fate of everyone and are important to the way of life in the villages and their culture. When the whites came into town it caused many to question their traditions and beliefs and although some of their beliefs would be discouraged in our society, they are acceptable and just the way of life to the villagers. The traditions and beliefs decide the fate of everyone in the village based on the citizens’ actions towards others, the earth and…

Niki Caro’s Whale Rider – An analysis in relation to journeys

The inner journey is one which involves the hurdling of psychological barriers, as well as cultural and social obstacles, rather than just a physical trek. The novel Things Fall Apart (1958) by Chinua Achebe and the film Whale Rider (2002) by Niki Caro both address the overcoming of emotional boundaries, while following the progress of the main characters. Issues such as cultural differences and gender equality are presented by the composers through the clever use of devices appropriate to the medium, while using the post-colonial context to accentuate these issues. Similar to Things Fall Apart, the film Whale Rider by Niki Caro explores the breakdown of Maori culture in post-colonial New Zealand. It follows the journeys of Pai, a young…

“Things Fall Apart” by Chinua Achebe

In Chinua Achebes Things Fall Apart, Okonkwo plays the role of father to his son, Nwoye, and his daughter, Ezinma. Okonkwo’s fear of looking weak like his father, which can be interpreted as his tragic flaw, causes him to expect more from both of his children and to act rashly, similar to the behavior of my father. Although both relationships—the relationship between Okonkwo and his son and the relationship between my father and I—involve disagreements between father and son, I constantly aim to see eye to eye with my father, just like Okonkwo and Ezinma, whereas Nwoye does not attempt to fulfill his fathers wishes. The relationship between Okonkwo and Nwoye is one of disagreement, contretemps, and failure; Okonkwos inflexible…

Characters in Chinua Achebe’s Books

Chinua Achebe shows the custom, especially, African values and attitudes through his characters in his novel, Things Fall Apart. Okonkwo is an ideal Ibo man who achieves wealth and fame out of nothing, but this causes him to be conceited and disdainful of less successful. Pride is a noble quality that man should have, but sometimes, when the source of that pride is fear and insecurity instead of true faith in oneself, pride could be destructive. In the book, Chinua Achebe uses the direct characterization, character dialogue and foil to reveal how Okonkwos incorrigible pride led him to his own destruction. First of all, Achebe uses direct comments from the narrator to describe Okonkwos thoughts and action so that the…

“Stanley Meets Mutesa” by David Rubadiri

In the poem, “Stanley Meets Mutesa” by David Rubadiri, a British man, perhaps Stanley, and his party walk for a long time in both harsh and hopeful conditions. When they reach King Mutesa’s kingdom, they are not welcomed warmly because the villagers do not trust the British men. Finally, the British men are allowed into the village without a fight. Secondly, throughout the poem the mood is different. In the first two stanzas the mood is harsh and melancholy because the men are walking under the “fierce and scorching” sun. Also the men were malnourished and physically exhausted because “each afternoon a human skeleton collapsed”. This line puts a very clear image into the reader’s mind that the men were…

Tragic Character and Plot in Things Fall Apart

Robbie Jones Ms. Cheney English 1 Honors Period 1 22 May 2012 Tragic Character and Plot in Things Fall Apart Despite being written in 1959 and set in Nigeria, Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe reads much like a Greek tragedy. AmidstPrinciples from Aristotle’s theory of tragedy in the Poetics are evident throughout the novel, and contribute to the development of the protagonist and the incidents of the plot. Amid the images of slaves, missionaries, and western colonialism, Achebe uses these principles to create a tragic character and plot that carrypropel his story. Components of a the tragic character incorporated into the novel are present in the protagonist, Okonkwo. FirstIn him, the concept of hamartia, a tragic flaw in the…

Wexler’s “Violence in a Secular Age: Conrad’s Solution”

Wexler’s “Violence in a Secular Age: Conrad’s Solution” Joyce Wexler, in her essay “Writing About Violence in a Secular Age: Conrad’s Solution,” states that twentieth-century writers claimed contemporary violence was inexpressible. Such violent acts were justified in the past, but became a dilemma, a “crisis of belief,” in the late nineteenth-century. The dilemma became present in the works of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness and other works of the time. Upon the opening of this essay, Joyce Wexler mentions a variety of works from the likes of James Joyce and T.S. Eliot to exemplify that many twentieth-century writers claim that acts of violence in their times were “not only unimaginable but inexpressible.” Wexler states that such atrocities were not new…