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Achilles Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Hero Myth – Achilles

The concept of the hero is as old as myth itself. Throughout history both concepts have evolved together. Myths tell tales of the adventures of man, frequently the son of a god or goddess and a human, who is endowed with great promise and destined to perform great feats. Often these feats involve acts of rescue, war or protection. This heroic myth is rooted in the ideal of familial romance. Particularly during adolescence it sustains and expresses the identification of the ego with idealized imagery. The hero myths have been used for centuries to educate and train youths as parts of institutions and groups. One example of a hero is Achilles, made famous through Homer’s epic Illiad. While we may…

Greek Mythology and Achilles Introduction

Introduction Once upon a time, long ago there was a marvelous battle called the Trojan War, but before hand, there lived a Greek god named Peleus who extracted love for the Sea goddess Thetis. As time passed, they became one, so they thought why not form our love in to a child. When their child was born, Thetis dipped him into the river styx which was in the underworld (Achilles). Thus made him immortal and his name was Achilles. When Thetis dipped Achilles in to the underworld, she held him from his heel, this spot remained vulnerable, (Achilles). Meaning it was the only spot in his body that remained mortal. Achilles’ parents knew that he would become the greatest fighter…

Greek Mythology and Gods

* People today have scientific explanations for events like thunder, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions. * The ancient Greeks did not-they believed their gods caused these events to happen, and they created myths to explain the gods’ actions. * The Greeks saw the work of the gods in events all around them. * For example, the Greeks lived in an area where volcanic eruptions were common. * To explain these eruptions, they told stories about the god Hephaestus, who lived underground. * The fire and lava that poured out of volcanoes, the Greeks said, came from the huge fires of this god’s forge. * At this forge he created weapons and armor for the other gods. * The Greeks did not…

Greek Mythology Compare And Contrast

Theseus and Achilles were both great heroes that played important roles in Greek Mythology. Theseus saved many lives by killing a Minotaur, and by solving the labyrinth. Achilles was a fierce combatant for the Greeks in the Trojan War. Both heroes accomplished many great challenges in their lifetimes; however, it is hard to decide who the better hero is. While both Achilles and Theseus fought for their people, Achilles was more concerned about his own well-being, whereas Theseus cared more others. Throughout Theseus’s and Achilles’s lives, Theseus led a much more selfless life than Achilles. When Oedipus was thrust out of his city, Theseus took him in. Oedipus was hated by everyone. Under Apollo’s Oracle of Delphi, Oedipus was foretold to…

Greek Mythology and Prometheus

Prometheus is a God who was a beneficiary to mankind. Son of the Titan Iapetus, he worked to benefit the lives of man, not the lives of the Gods. Prometheus was assigned by Zeus to create mankind from water and earth, but in the process gave man more power than Zeus had anticipated. Zeus wanted man to have a lack of power, especially over fire, but Prometheus defies what Zeus wants and gave the power of fire to mankind. Concerned more with the well being of the man, Prometheus steals lightning and fire from Zeus and gives the power of fire to mankind. Zeus is extremely angered by this act of disobedience and states to Prometheus, “I bet you are…

Greece and Rome

In ancient Greece and Rome, a hero was set apart by their strength and their achievements, which far surpassed ordinary mortals. These heroes were demi-gods of half-mortal, half-divine percentage. In order to be seen as a true hero, he followed what they called the ‘hero pattern’, beginning with his origin, followed by his journey. His journey is then divided into 3 distinct parts; separation or departure, penetration of the power source, and finally the return or reintegration. Today, we don’t have such high expectations. Our heroes don’t have to follow any extensive ‘hero pattern’, as long as he is simply a man of perfection; courageous, intelligent, selfless, handsome, etc. When comparing the stories of our Greek heroes traditionally versus modernly,…

Achilles and Odysseus

It is not unknown that people look up to heroes and even try to emulate their actions; however, there is a relevant question that needs to be asked in order to facilitate a thorough understanding of what differentiates a hero—from someone who is merely fighting for himself. According to Aristotle’s Politics (9), “[… ] he who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficient for himself, must either be a beast or a god: he is no part of a state. ” While it may not seem to be rather obvious, but this particular line in Aristotle’s Politics tacitly implies that men who possess extraordinary characteristics and goals, such as heroes can be…

The Rage Of Achilles

The Achilles of ancient Greek legend is often counted among the greatest of epic heroes for his fantastical exploits during the Trojan War as depicted by Homer in the Iliad. While it is easy to become seduced by the power and might of invincible Achilles we must remember to not confuse unchecked power with heroism. While Achilles is indeed powerful, a master warrior by all qualifications, he fails as a hero to be imitated or idolized due to his lack of restraint, his barbarity, his lack of a code of conduct, his impiety and his dishonorable behavior. Achilles wields great courage and fortitude but he is also is critically deficient in the other (perhaps more important) cornerstones of the epic…

David Malouf explores the emotional and physical struggle

David Malouf explores the emotional and physical struggle a hero must face before attaining glory. Evaluate this statement. In your response discuss how two characters are represented as heroic through their quest. Heroism is a valued concept that has transcended through time and has been the subject of a great deal of literature. David Malouf’s appropriation of Homers epic The Iliad explores this notion of heroism through the characterization of King Priam, directly battling the contextual hero of the time, Achilles. Through descriptive language and stylistic conventions, Malouf showcases that it is the emotional and physical struggle that a man must face to ultimately attain glory, thus becoming a hero. This statement is epitomized through the contrasting protagonists Priam and…

Mythological Women

Attitudes toward women in mythology reflect the attitudes that still exist today around the world. In mythology women always seem to mess up and make mistakes. Women are viewed as incapable in mythology. The attitudes toward women in both Judeo-Christian/Western and Greek mythology are negative. One of the three types of mythology that are going to be discussed about is humanity mythology. In Judeo-Christian/Western humanity mythology, there is the parable of “Adam and Eve”. In “Adam and Eve”, God tells them to not eat from the forbidden tree. Eve, the woman, is tempted and ends up disobeying God by eating an apple from the tree that was forbidden. On the other hand, in Greek humanity mythology there is the story…

Mythological Hero Comparison

Ancient and Modern Super Heroes Hero myths are the best-known mythological stories because they involve colossal characters that are easily recognizable. In ancient Greece heroes such as Homer’s Odysseus, Apollo, and Achilles are “super heroes.” In modern day literature and pop culture mythological characters like those found in comic books are the equivalent. Super heroes and their stories involve characters that put themselves in harm’s way to protect something or someone else. Whether it is ancient Greek mythology one is studying or modern day comic book characters, the theme, and meaning are the same. In other words, “the story they tell belongs to us all” (Powell, 1990, p. 8). A modern day super hero who protects his society while maintaining…

Do changes that make our life easier always make them better?

“Technology promises to make our lives easier, freeing up time for leisure pursuits. But the rapid pace of technological innovation and the split second processing capabilities of computers that can work virtually nonstop have made all of us feel rushed. We have adopted the relentless pace of the very machines that we supposed to simplify our lives, with the result that, whether at work or play, people do not feel like their lives have changed for the better.” It was once said that “The only thing constant in life is change.” Indeed this maxim is true. Changes permeates most aspects of live, for better of for worse. Change (such as technological innovation) may make life easier, but change does not…

Malouf Demonstrates That a Leap of Faith Is Essential for Success

Malouf demonstrates that often, a leap of faith is essential for success in life. Do you agree? In David Malouf’s modern re-telling of Homer’s Illiad, the development of the characters in achieving catharsis and discovery of self is explored. Malouf demonstrates that a leap of faith is often essential for success in life. The leaps of faith are defined within the contexts of the characters that are making this leap. As fate is traditionally accepted in the Illiad, Malouf’s retelling shows that the leap of faith to defy this norm and take chances can lead to personal success. Malouf also demonstrates that exploring realms of the new can lead to discovery of self; a goal in life that some characters…

Ransom: What Defines a Man

‘Ransom’ demonstrates that it is a man’s actions that define him. Discuss. While Priam’s decision to defy kingly conventions and act as ‘an ordinary man’ shows that a man’s actions can indeed make up a significant element of one’s identity, Malouf also makes it clear that a man’s emotional connections with others define him. Priam’s humble request of Achilles, and Achille’s agreement to this, humanize the two men and highlight their compassionate sides as opposed to their societal statuses. However, the love both men have for their sons is, and always has been, entrenched in their identities, and prompts these life-changing actions. In dismissing his royal obligations and appealing to Achilles as a man and a father, Priam defied his…