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Abraham Lincoln Letter to Horace Greeley Analysis Essay

The second Inaugural was writing during the time of the Civil War. The struggle between the north and the south continued. President Lincoln seemed to be mostly supportive of the north, which can be concluded based on being opposed to slavery. Regardless, the president was trying to save the union, even though it would mean not freeing the slaves “If I could save the union without freeing any slave, I would do so” (Lincoln, p. 1, 1862). Especially in his letter to Horace Greeley, one can see how eager the president was to save the union.

With the Quote “Both read the same Bible, and pray to the same God; and each invokes his aid against the other” Lincoln is emphasizing on the unity that the division actually has, which is being a good Christian and reading the bible. The second half of the quote shows the misuse of the bible. Invoking god to aid against the other is not what prayers are for “the almighty has his own purposes” and may not even be interested in resolving this issue. Instead, according to Lincoln, it is even possible that god disapproves of slavery and the civil war is part of their punishment.

Once again, an attempt is made to let the people realize that slavery is unethical and may even upset god. In conclusion, both sides are Christian, which should be bounding, as religion is supposed to bring people closer together. Secondly, prayers are not used for what it should. America has lost sight of what is important according to god, which is peace (with slaves) and not aiding war. I consider the quote as significant, because of the impact has. The people are again reminded on values of true Christianity, which even in modern America, one can lose sight of.


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