sample
Haven't found the Essay You Want?
GET YOUR CUSTOM ESSAY SAMPLE
For Only $12.90/page

Police Corruption Essay

This paper intends to reintroduce “police corruption” by defining it, briefly mentioning real-life examples, discussing its types and levels, stating that there is also ‘right corruption’, restating its causes and effects, as well as, how this dilemma may be addressed.

Police Corruption Defined

“Acts involving the misuse of authority by a police officer in a manner designed to produce personal gain for himself or others” is the technical definition of “police corruption” (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 296). In addition to that it is said that the act of “police corruption occurs when a police officer accepts money, goods, or services for actions they are sworn to do anyway or when they accept anything for ignoring actions they are sworn to invoke legal procedures against” (Ivkovic, 2005, pp. 15 – 32).

Real-Life Examples of Police Corruption

There are several true-to-life incidents with regards to “police corruption”; take for instance the following:

During the 80s there were seventy five police officers in Miami who were charged for “police corruption” (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 297). There were some who were arrested because of “drug dealing” (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 297).

In New York City, almost the same incident occurred in 1992 since there were six police officers who bought drugs in their “inner city precincts and selling it in the suburban communities” where they dwell in (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 297). During the same year, a police chief was convicted of illegally taking $2,600,000.00 from their department (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 298).

Then in 1996, there were three police officers in Detroit who were involved in a “Texas-to-Michigan cocaine smuggling ring” (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 297). During the same year, there were six police officers in Illinois accepted money in exchange of allowing twenty drug dealers do business in their area (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 297). In addition to that, a police director was sent to prison for “malfeasance, mail & wire fraud, tax fraud, accepting gifts, making false statements, and forging documents” (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 298).

Corruption Types

There are several types of “police corruption” and these are the following:

First is technically referred to as “taking gratuities” which is defined as accepting tips in petty amounts or price cut on products bought (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 298). Accepting tips is not usually illegal, however, if the police officer accepts such and will grant the request of a person that he carries out something negative then the police officer should be charged for it (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 298).

Second is known as “taking bribes” which is defined technically as accepting money with the purpose of undermining the objectives of the “criminal justice system” (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 298).

Third is “theft/burglary” or stealing of money or property while carrying out their responsibilities (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 298). “Theft/burglary” is considered another type of “police corruption” because there are many ways of doing so (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 298). For instance, since police can have access to “warehouses and store”, they can easily rob these themselves if they are tempted to (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 298).

The last is known as “internal corruption” (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 298). It is defined as “paying colleagues or other people in the police department in exchange for special assignments or promotions” (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 299).

There are other uncategorized types of “police corruption” including the following: 1) accepting free meals; 2) accepting discounted products/services; 3) taking advantage of other people who are weak/helpless; 4) taking from establishments which are not highly protected; 5) asking for money in exchange for protecting activities which are illegal; 6) taking money in exchange of fixing cases; as well as, 7) planning to steal or rob an institution like a bank or a convenience store  (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 299).

Levels of Corruption

Interestingly, there are “levels of corruption” as well and these are the following:

It begins with the first level which is known as “rotten apples and rotten pockets” (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 299). Here, only one police officer is involved in an act of corruption (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 299).

The next level of corruption is called “pervasive and unorganized corruption” (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 299). Here, several police officers are involved but they do not have plans on how exactly they are to carry out such a corrupt act (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 299).

The third and final level is an invasive and well thought-out corruption (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 299). Here, almost everybody is involved; at least within the precinct or the department the policemen belong to (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 299).

The police officer usually begins by considering taking gratuities like meals/products/services for free which may result from peer pressure (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 300). Next to this stage, a police officer may consider accepting money to neglect regulatory wrongdoings (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 300). Unfortunately, a police officer may ‘develop’ into the final stage of corruption which involves accepting ‘gifts’, as well as, asking for it; he or she may now be on the lookout for a ‘kickback’ (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 300).

Right Corruption

Fascinatingly, not everything about “police corruption” is negative (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 300). There are instances wherein an act of corruption may be carried out to achieve a greater cause (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 300).

Effects of Police Corruption

However, it cannot be denied that there are countless negative effects of “police corruption” (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 300). Unfortunately, it weakens law implementation which leads to prevalent delinquent acts (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 300). It also eliminates self-respect not only for the police officer but for the entire department itself making it more impossible for discipline to be established within the organization (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 300). Furthermore, the society loses their hope that they may be protected against delinquent people and other threats which leads to non-belief in the whole criminal justice system itself (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 300).

Causes of Police Corruption

“Police corruption” exists because of the following: 1) It occurs because it is observable and thus can be learned/imitated; 2) It happens because the nature of their work allows them to carry out a ‘corrupt’ act & they are sometimes tempted to do so because they have the power to do so and because they can earn a lot by doing so; 3) Police officers are not very well motivated by their work due to the following: inadequate pay, no room for growth, no extensive training, etcetera and so they tend to engage in “police corruption” (Ivkovic, 2005, pp. 63 -96).

Addressing Police Corruption

Fortunately, there are steps we can do to address this problem (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 300). Experts say that it is important to acknowledge first that “police corruption” is being experienced (Ivkovic, 2005, pp. 97 – 134). Second is to institute “internal affairs divisions” to watch and regulate police officers (Dempsey et. al., 2005, p. 300). Third is to motivate the police force so that they will love their jobs and would not engage in “police corruption”, for instance, they should be trained, rewarded/praised, provided with a good salary, as well as, promoted when necessary (Ivkovic, 2005, pp. 97 – 134).


Essay Topics:


Sorry, but copying text is forbidden on this website. If you need this or any other sample, we can send it to you via email. Please, specify your valid email address

We can't stand spam as much as you do No, thanks. I prefer suffering on my own