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The fall of the City: unnatural growth Essay

Every child has their own maturity and prefrence level. Should one’s behaviour be forced to change because of the stereotypes in society? In Alden Nowlan’s The Fall of the City, he writes in first person about a young honorable boy ,named Teddy, disagreeing with his uncle to be a well taught normal boy. It is important for a child to grow up and become an adult ,but they need to be the one building themselves up. Instead of being forced like Teddy. Alden Nowlan develops Teddy by comparing him with his uncle with a strong tone stereotipical man of the house. He also created hidden messages by having the war between Danova and Upalia relate to the conflict between Teddy and his uncle.

Throughout the story, Teddy’s imagination falls apart slowly as he roughly transitions from an imaginative boy into his father’s fantasy, to protect himself emotionally. After his uncle told him to start his homework, “his uncle stood in the doorway between kitchen and living room, his shoulders shaking with laughter. ‘you’d never guess what that kid has been doing up there!’ … that great lummox has been playing with paper dolls!” while Teddy knows that he will need to grow up sometime. his guardians that are living with him are trying to help, Teddy does not think that they he is playing with paper dolls. The Uncle creates his own opinion and forces Teddy to change by making fun of him. Teddy should be influenced to change instead of forced.

Nowlan uses an interesting tone to create complicated and a somewhat confused emotional quality to the story. During the argument with Teddy and his uncle, The tone starts to be more vulnerable when “Teddy’s fists were clenched … his voice shaking … his uncle pointed a warning finger” which converts the atmosphere to be more serious.

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