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Distinctively Visual speech Essay

Good morning/afternoon class and maim, I am here today to demonstrate my understanding of the concept of distinctively visual, through an analysis of the relationship between Henry Lawson’s short story ‘The Drover’s Wife’ , with a strong, courageous and determined woman that deals with the severe, unmerciful Australian outback. The painting ‘Battling Bushfires by the Alan J. Benge in 2007 illustrates a woman, face to face fighting against a bushfire encroaching on her land. Another Henry Lawson short story “The Loaded Dog” is about a dog that innocently takes a stick of dynamite, sparking it as he runs past the camp fire, then tries to play with it and in fear, everyone that runs away, and thirdly, James Reeves “The Sea”, a poem that creates an extended metaphor of a dog, which illustrates the change of behaviour of both a dog and the sea.

My chosen related text “battling bushfires” is a distinctively visual image that explores the harsh and rugged environment of the Australian outback and the people in it. In this painting, the artist powerfully depicts the determination and strength of the salient figure the woman, as she battles the fire that is encroaching on her land destroying everything in its path and potentially, her house seen in the background of the painting. Bege carefully uses his brush techniques and colours, such as the black, dark reds and orange illustrating the striking image of heat and the threat of danger, as well as the diagonal lines of vector, of the fire and her arms, to reinforce the woman standing, fighting face to face with the advancing fire. Distinctively visual is represented by the dominance of the woman in the foreground as she stands there strong and determined, leading a small team of men battling the fire with only a few wet sacks. She is the only female figure in this painting which emphasizes to the audience her courage as she battles to save the family home.

As the team, composing of mostly men, work together to battle the bushfire, using the true Australian pioneer spirit, it is the female figure in a dress that dominates the painting. She is the major visual centre piece of the picture. The only woman fighting the fire beside strong hardy men highlights the bravery and courage of the hardworking qualities of the woman battling to save her home. “The Drover’s Wife” clearly mirrors the painting with her similar qualities of protectiveness and experiences with battling bushfires not letting fear get in the way as he puts on her husband’s trousers to battle the fire. Lawson creates a distinctively visual picture of the “Drover’s Wife” for the reader through his use of descriptive language as it creates an engaging image in the readers imagination of the “gaunt sun browned woman” as she battles her way through life of the Australian outback.

“The Sea” by James reeves is a poem that successfully makes an extended metaphor that depicts a distinctive image of a dog by relating it to “the sea”. Reeves also links the different behaviours of the sea, and how it relates to the behaviours and moods of a dog. “The sea” is brought to life as Reeves uses a number of literary tools, for example, the use of onomatopoeia or sound words such as “Roars”, “sniffs” and “snuffs” describes the poem vividly capturing reader’s imagination. He grasps the relation between the giant grey dog and ocean. The playful more happy nature of a dog is visualised in the first stanza as Reeves imagery describes the ocean and relates it’s be behaviours to a dog, with the way they roll around on the beach.

This is similar to the way the rough waves tumble and crash on the ocean shore. Over the three stanzas we are able to see the recognisable shift of mood from anger to playfulness to complete relaxation.P Henry Lawson’s “the loaded dog”, mirrors the atmosphere of the environment created by reeves, as the lively behavioural characters of the dog in “the sea”, are parallel with the also lively, playful, mischievous dog in “the loaded dog”. There is a contrasting objective with the two composing animals, clearly separating the two characterisations of the yellow vicious canine, in henry Lawson’s short story, and the joyful big black dog. The way both the authors have creatively used language, encourages the mind’s eye to vividly capture the images that he writers are trying to express.

The readers visualises the scenes in “the loaded dog” because the narration is skilfully manipulated to build and hold tension throughout the story. In conclusion, I was able use all the four texts to show my knowledge and understanding of the topic distinctively visual and how they relate to composing texts. When relating materials we can display how each of the themes from each text plays its role with the overall result for the reader. The woman in battling bushfires, was the distinctive image as she stood out leading the team of men to fight the fire that was potentially destroying her house. My last related material “the sea” linked the sea to a distinctive image of a dog through the use of the descriptive language that captures the reader from start to finish, showing the recognisable shifts of mood. Thank you. The sea is a hungry dog,

Giant and grey.
He rolls on the beach all day.
With his clashing teeth and shaggy jaws
Hour upon hour he gnaws
The rumbling, tumbling stones,
And ‘Bones, bones, bones, bones! ‘
The giant sea-dog moans,
Licking his greasy paws.

And when the night wind roars
And the moon rocks in the stormy cloud,
He bounds to his feet and snuffs and sniffs,
Shaking his wet sides over the cliffs,
And howls and hollos long and loud.

But on quiet days in May or June,
When even the grasses on the dune
Play no more their reedy tune,
With his head between his paws
He lies on the sandy shores,
So quiet, so quiet, he scarcely snores.

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